Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French carousser (to quaff, drink, swill), from German gar aus (literally quite out), from gar austrinken (to drink up entirely, guzzle).[1] Compare German Garaus.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

carouse (third-person singular simple present carouses, present participle carousing, simple past and past participle caroused)

  1. (intransitive) To engage in a noisy or drunken social gathering. [from 1550s]
    We are all going to carouse at Brian's tonight.
  2. (intransitive) To drink to excess.
    If I survive this headache, I promise no more carousing at Brian's.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

carouse (plural carouses)

  1. A large draught of liquor.
    • Sir J. Davies
      a full carouse of sack
    • Shakespeare
      Drink carouses to the next day's fate.
  2. A drinking match; a carousal.
    • Alexander Pope
      The early feast and late carouse.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ carouse” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

AnagramsEdit