English edit

 
A sheet of paper.
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology edit

From Middle English paper, borrowed from Anglo-Norman paper, papier, from Latin papȳrus, from Ancient Greek πάπυρος (pápuros). Doublet of papyros and papyrus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

paper (countable and uncountable, plural papers)

  1. A sheet material typically used for writing on or printing on (or as a non-waterproof container), usually made by draining cellulose fibres from a suspension in water.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter X, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, →OCLC:
      He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.
  2. A newspaper or anything used as such (such as a newsletter or listing magazine).
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall [pseudonym; Arthur Hammond Marshall], chapter II, in The Squire’s Daughter, New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead and Company, published 1919, →OCLC:
      "I don't want to spoil any comparison you are going to make," said Jim, "but I was at Winchester and New College." ¶ "That will do," said Mackenzie. "I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal. []."
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 1, in Death on the Centre Court:
      “Anthea hasn't a notion in her head but to vamp a lot of silly mugwumps. She's set her heart on that tennis bloke [] whom the papers are making such a fuss about.”
    • 2023 March 8, Paul Salveson, “Fond farewells to two final trains...”, in RAIL, number 978, page 54:
      However, Anyon Kay remembers a Mr Walton Ainsworth, of Beech House, Rivington, who owned mills in Bolton, being a regular user before the First World War. He used to drive by horse and trap from his mansion to catch the 0906 train to Bolton each day. Before arriving at the station, local newsagent Tom Dutton would hand Mr Ainsworth his morning paper!
  3. (uncountable) Wallpaper.
  4. (uncountable) Wrapping paper.
  5. (rock paper scissors) An open hand (a handshape resembling a sheet of paper), that beats rock and loses to scissors. It loses to lizard and beats Spock in rock-paper-scissors-lizard-Spock.
  6. A written document, generally shorter than a book (white paper, term paper), in particular one written for the Government.
  7. A written document that reports scientific or academic research and is usually subjected to peer review before publication in a scientific journal (as a journal article or the manuscript for one) or in the proceedings of a scientific or academic meeting (such as a conference, workshop, or symposium).
  8. A scholastic essay.
    • 2014 January, Claire Kramsch, “Language and Culture”, in AILA Review[1], volume 27, number 5, John Benjamins, →DOI, →ISSN, page 30:
      This paper surveys the research methods and approaches used in the multidisciplinary field of applied language studies or language education over the last fourty[sic] years. Drawing on insights gained in psycho- and sociolinguistics, educational linguistics and linguistic anthropology with regard to language and culture, it is organized around five major questions that concern language educators.
  9. (Britain, Hong Kong) A set of examination questions to be answered at one session.
  10. (slang) Money.
  11. (finance, uncountable) Any financial assets other than specie.
    • 1812, William Major, Theory of Money and Exchanges, page XV:
      Why might not a Government annuity, the Principal of which was originally invested in Paper since the Cash suspension in 1797, be constituted the guarantee of Paper Money, emendating from that investiture and suspension, and the Parliament authority transferred to its security, as it has been to its creation, in preference to all others, while Paper continues our general Medium.
    • 1859, The Bankers' Magazine, and Statistical Register, page 244:
      [] three millions and a half specie in its vaults, and nearly six millions invested in paper, loans, discounts, pledges []
  12. (New Zealand) A university course. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  13. A paper packet containing a quantity of items.
    a paper of pins, tacks, opium, etc.
  14. A medicinal preparation spread upon paper, intended for external application.
    cantharides paper
  15. A substance resembling paper secreted by certain invertebrates as protection for their nests and eggs.
  16. (dated) Free passes of admission to a theatre, etc.
  17. (dated, by extension) The people admitted by free passes.

Synonyms edit

Hyponyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Hawaiian: pepa
  • Japanese: ペーパー (pēpā)
  • Maori: pepa
  • Niuean: pepa
  • Tok Pisin: pepa

Translations edit

Adjective edit

paper (not comparable)

  1. Made of paper.
    paper bag; paper plane
    • 1892, Walter Besant, chapter II, in The Ivory Gate [], New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], →OCLC:
      At twilight in the summer [] the mice come out. They [] eat the luncheon crumbs. Mr. Checkly, for instance, always brought his dinner in a paper parcel in his coat-tail pocket, and ate it when so disposed, sprinkling crumbs lavishly [] on the floor.
  2. Insubstantial (from the weakness of common paper)
    paper tiger; paper gangster
  3. Planned (from plans being drawn up on paper)
    paper rocket; paper engine
  4. Having a title that is merely official, or given by courtesy or convention.
    a paper baron; a paper lord

Translations edit

See also edit

Verb edit

paper (third-person singular simple present papers, present participle papering, simple past and past participle papered)

  1. (transitive) To apply paper to.
    to paper the hallway walls
  2. (transitive) To document; to memorialize.
    After they reached an agreement, their staffs papered it up.
  3. (transitive) To fill (a theatre or other paid event) with complimentary seats.
    Synonym: paper the house
    • 2020, Kelly Kessler, Broadway in the Box, page 198:
      Later, seat-filling or “papering” services cropped up, with organizations like Audience Extras, Play-by-Play, []
  4. (transitive) To submit official papers to (a law court, etc.).
    • 2006, Drusilla Modjeska, The Best Australian Essays 2006[2]:
      As powerhouse lawyers shuttled to Cuba to meet clients and papered the federal courts with habeas corpus petitions, Guantanamo's isolation and lack of publicity, once the military's most powerful psychological weapon, was eliminated.
    • 2007, Thomas M. Hanna, The Employer's Legal Advisor: Handling Problem Employees Effectively ...[3]:
      [] the warning received only six weeks later for poor attendance as proof that the employer was unjustly papering his personnel file in an effort to create a reason for discharge.
  5. (transitive) To give public notice (typically by displaying posters) that a person is wanted by the police or other authority.
  6. (transitive) To sandpaper.
  7. (transitive) To enfold in paper.
  8. To paste the endpapers and flyleaves at the beginning and end of a book before fitting it into its covers.
  9. (Northeastern US) To cover someone's house with toilet paper. Otherwise known as toilet papering or TPing.

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology edit

First attested in 1249.[1] Semi-learned borrowing from Latin papȳrus (adapted to a Catalan suffix;[2][3] cf. Medieval Latin paperium), from Ancient Greek πάπυρος (pápuros). Paper-making was introduced to Europe by the Arabs in the Middle Ages through Italy and Spain.[4] Compare also Old Occitan and French papier, Occitan papièr, Old French paper.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

paper m (plural papers)

  1. paper
  2. role

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ paper”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2024
  2. ^ paper”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2024
  3. ^ Joan Coromines; José A. Pascual (1983–1991) Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos
  4. ^ Etymology and history of “papier”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.

Further reading edit

Cornish edit

Noun edit

paper m

  1. paper

References edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English paper. Doublet of papier and papyrus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

paper m or n (plural papers, diminutive papertje n)

  1. (informal) paper (short essay or research document), particularly a research paper
    Synonyms: essay, opstel

Derived terms edit

Latvian edit

Verb edit

paper

  1. inflection of papērt:
    1. second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person plural present indicative
    3. second-person singular imperative
  2. (with the particle lai) third-person singular imperative of papērt
  3. (with the particle lai) third-person plural imperative of papērt

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman paper, from Latin papȳrus, from Ancient Greek πάπυρος (pápuros). Doublet of papirus.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /paˈpeːr/, /paːˈpeːr/, /ˈpaːpər/, /ˈpapər/, /ˈpaːpiːr/

Noun edit

paper (plural papyres)

  1. paper (thin, white writing surface made of wood pulp)
  2. A message or note; something that is written.
  3. A record or accounting document.

Descendants edit

References edit

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin papȳrus (likely via a northern Italian intermediate, itself a semi-learned derivative of Medieval Latin paperium), from Ancient Greek πάπυρος (pápuros). Cf. the regional variant paupier. Cognate with Old Occitan papier. Compare also the Medieval Judeo-French paveil (type of reed), inherited from a Vulgar Latin form *papelius. Paper-making was introduced to Europe by the Arabs in the Middle Ages through Italy and Spain/Catalonia.[1]

Noun edit

paper oblique singularm (oblique plural papers, nominative singular papers, nominative plural paper)

  1. reed (plant)
  2. paper (for writing on, etc.)
  3. document

Descendants edit

References edit

  1. ^ Etymology and history of “papier”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English paper.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpeipeɾ/ [ˈpei̯.peɾ]
  • Rhymes: -eipeɾ
  • Syllabification: pa‧per

Noun edit

paper m (plural papers)

  1. paper (written document that reports scientific or academic research)
    • 2020 July 23, Juan Felipe Vélez, “Colombia discute la legalización y comercialización de la cocaína”, in PanAm Post[4]:
      Hay varios papers recientes sobre el efecto de la regularización del acceso a opioides en Estados Unidos [...]
      There are some recent papers on the effect of the regularization of access to opioids in the United States [...]

Usage notes edit

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.