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See also: Casa, casá, casà, casã, casă, cåsa, časa, and čaša

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish casa.

NounEdit

casa (plural casas)

  1. (slang) house
    • Francis Bret Harte
      I saw that Enriquez had made no attempt to modernize the old casa, and that even the garden was left in its lawless native luxuriance.
    • 1991 May 12, "Kidnapped!" Jeeves and Wooster, Series 2, Episode 5:
      Chuffy: WHAT? No, no, no, no, no. My casa is your casa, what?
    Get out of my casa!

AnagramsEdit


AragoneseEdit

 
Aragonese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia an

EtymologyEdit

From Latin casa.

NounEdit

casa f (plural cases)

  1. house

AsturianEdit

 
Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ast

EtymologyEdit

From Latin casa.

NounEdit

casa f (plural cases)

  1. house

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin casa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

casa f (plural cases)

  1. house

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

casa

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of casar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of casar

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

casa

  1. third-person singular past historic of caser

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin casa.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): [ˈkas̺ɐ]

NounEdit

casa f (plural casas)

  1. house

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

casa (plural casas)

  1. house
  2. home

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

casa

  1. nominative and vocative and dative and strong genitive plural of cas

VerbEdit

casa

  1. inflection of cas:
    1. present subjunctive analytic
    2. (obsolete) second-person singular present indicative

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
casa chasa gcasa
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin casa (house).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Northern Italy) IPA(key): /ˈkaː.za/
  • (Central and Southern Italy, Sardinia, Standard Italian) IPA(key): /ˈkaː.sa/
  • (file)

NounEdit

casa f (plural case)

  1. house
  2. home
  3. shop
  4. (board games) square
  5. Family, dynasty, descent, extraction, stock, lineage, birth, origin, race (in the sense of the preceding words, not "human race").
  6. Company, firm.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Possibly from either Proto-Indo-European *kat- (to link or weave together; chain, net) (compare catēna (chain)), or Proto-Indo-European *ket- (hut, shed) (compare Old English heaþor (restraint, confinement, enclosure, prison), Avestan 𐬐𐬀𐬙𐬀 (kata, chamber), Mazanderani کَت (kat, wall)), likely through borrowing from another Indo-European language rather than inheritance.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

casa f (genitive casae); first declension

  1. hut, cottage, house
InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative casa casae
genitive casae casārum
dative casae casīs
accusative casam casās
ablative casā casīs
vocative casa casae
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of cāsus (fallen).

PronunciationEdit

ParticipleEdit

cāsa

  1. nominative feminine singular of cāsus
  2. nominative neuter plural of cāsus
  3. accusative neuter plural of cāsus
  4. vocative feminine singular of cāsus
  5. vocative neuter plural of cāsus

cāsā

  1. ablative feminine singular of cāsus

ReferencesEdit

  • casa in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • casa in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • casa in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • casa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • casa in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill

Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

casa

  1. inflection of cas:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative and accusative dual

OccitanEdit

 
Occitan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia oc

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin casa.

NounEdit

casa f (plural cases)

  1. house

Old SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin casam, accusative of casa (cottage).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

casa f (plural casas)

  1. house
    • c. 1200: Almeric, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 80r. col. 1.
      [] dixo nuestro sennor a ieremias, ve a casa del orcero e yo fablaré contigo.
      [] Our Lord said to Jeremiah, go to the potter's house, and I will speak to you there.

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
 
casa

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese casa, from Latin casa (cottage), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *kat- (to link or weave together; chain, net; hut, shed).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

casa f (plural casas)

  1. house (structure serving as an abode of human beings)
    • 2005, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e o Enigma do Príncipe (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Rocco, page 135:
      Ele agora tem uma casa nas montanhas, foi Dumbledore que arranjou, uma bela caverna.
      He now has a house in the mountains, Dumbledore is who provided it, a beautiful cave.
    Aquela casa é grande.That house is big.
  2. home (one’s own dwelling place)
    Synonyms: lar
    Estou em casa.I'm at home.
  3. (in compounds) shop (establishment that sells goods or service)
    Synonyms: loja
    Casa de carnes.Butcher’s shop.
  4. (board games) a cell which may be occupied by a piece (such as a square in a chessboard)
  5. a digit position
    No número 12345, o algarismo 3 ocupa a casa das centenas.
    In the number 12345, the digit 3 is in the hundreds’ place.
  6. house (noble family)

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

casa

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of casar
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of casar

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:casar.

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

NounEdit

casa f

  1. definite singular nominative and accusative form of casă.

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin casa.

NounEdit

casa f (plural casas)

  1. (Sursilvan) house

SicilianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin casa

NounEdit

casa f (plural casi)

  1. house

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin casa (cottage).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

casa f (plural casas)

  1. house

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

casa

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of casar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of casar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of casar.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Italian cassa

NounEdit

casa f (plural case)

  1. case
  2. cash desk
  3. fund
  4. coffin

See alsoEdit