EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cēnsus, from cēnseō. See censor.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsɛnsəs/
  • (file)

NounEdit

census (countable and uncountable, plural censuses or censusses or census)

  1. An official count or enumeration of members of a population (not necessarily human), usually residents or citizens in a particular region, often done at regular intervals.
  2. Count, tally.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

census (third-person singular simple present censuses or censusses, present participle censusing or censussing, simple past and past participle censused or censussed)

  1. (transitive) To conduct a census on.
    • 1893, Census of India, 1891, volume 23, page 347:
      Each page of the schedule was crossruled with 8 lines, capable of censussing 8 individuals.
    • 2008, Pierandrea Brichetti et al., “Recent declines in urban Italian Sparrow Passer (domesticus) italiae populations in northern Italy”, in Ibis, page 179, column 2:
      Indeed, none of the recorded characteristics of buildings nor their location affected our counts of breeding Sparrows, which appeared to be distributed rather homogeneously across the urban areas we censused.
  2. (intransitive) To collect a census.
    • 1965, Fauna & Flora, page 46:
      My initiation to waterfowl censussing took place in the early days of the A.W.E., as it is familiarly known, when I served as a junior to one of the ablest of the Witwatersrand pioneers, Royce Reed. The method used must remain one of the three basic methods of Transvaal waterfowl censussing, although it has certain inherent limitations.
    • 1995, Netherlands Journal of Zoology, volume 45, page 390:
      For 14 individuals, eight censusses per daily period were performed within two weeks (32 censusses per individual), each time recording the coordinates of location. The territories of the individuals were defined as the area defended successfully against conspecifics by agonistic and/or non-agonistic behaviour, as described by Wickler (1969) and Nelissen (1976). The locations of the territories were determined from censussing; their sizes were estimated by behavioural observations.

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin census.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛn.zʏs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: cen‧sus

NounEdit

census m (plural censussen)

  1. A census.
    Synonym: volkstelling
  2. (historical) A tax that one has to pay to receive the right to vote in jurisdictions with census suffrage.
    Synonym: cijns

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: sensus
  • Indonesian: sensus

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From cēnseō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cēnsus m (genitive cēnsūs); fourth declension

  1. census, a registering of the populace and their property
  2. A register resulting from a census.
  3. (poetic) Rich gifts, presents, wealth

DeclensionEdit

Fourth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cēnsus cēnsūs
Genitive cēnsūs cēnsuum
Dative cēnsuī cēnsibus
Accusative cēnsum cēnsūs
Ablative cēnsū cēnsibus
Vocative cēnsus cēnsūs

DescendantsEdit

All are borrowed.

AdjectiveEdit

cēnsus (feminine cēnsa, neuter cēnsum); first/second-declension adjective

  1. registered
  2. assessed

DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative cēnsus cēnsa cēnsum cēnsī cēnsae cēnsa
Genitive cēnsī cēnsae cēnsī cēnsōrum cēnsārum cēnsōrum
Dative cēnsō cēnsō cēnsīs
Accusative cēnsum cēnsam cēnsum cēnsōs cēnsās cēnsa
Ablative cēnsō cēnsā cēnsō cēnsīs
Vocative cēnse cēnsa cēnsum cēnsī cēnsae cēnsa

ReferencesEdit

  • census in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • census in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • census in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • census in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to hold the census: censum habere, agere (Liv. 3. 22)
    • to strike off the burgess-roll: censu prohibere, excludere
  • census in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • census in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin