See also: chapé and chapè

English

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Etymology

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From Middle English chape, from Old French chape (a churchman's cope, a cover, a chape), from Latin cappa, itself derived from Latin caput. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *káput- and Proto-Indo-European *kap- (head). Doublet of cap, cape, and cope.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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chape (plural chapes)

  1. The lower metallic cap at the end of a sword's scabbard.
    • 1904, Sir Guy Francis Laking, The Armoury of Windsor Castle: European Section, page 181:
      The blade is 33 in. long, of triangular section, etched, gilt and blued at the hilt. The scabbard is covered with black sole-skin, with a gilt locket and chape; the locket inscribed BLAND AND FOSTER, SWORD CUTLERS []
    • 2012 December 6, Roger Keverne, Jade, Springer, →ISBN, page 119:
      Sword and scabbard fittings comprise the sword pommel, the chape at the end of the scabbard, the sword guard at the top of the blade, the sword slide and its accompanying reverse fitting (the latter being sometimes referred to as a girdle-clasp) that were normally bound into the scabbard []
    • 2013 June 17, Henri Hubert, The Rise of the Celts, Routledge, →ISBN:
      The scabbard ended in a chape, which took two forms: sometimes it terminated in a ball, and sometimes in a crescent or fish-tail.
  2. Alternative form of chappe (rainguard) (piece fitted to a sword's crossguard).
    • 2018 July 30, Dierk Hagedorn, Bartlomiej Walczak, Medieval Armoured Combat: The 1450 Fencing Manuscript from New Haven, Casemate Publishers, →ISBN:
      [] the swords nevertheless do not lack the chape, the small leather piece that overlaps the crossguard in a semi-circle over the base of the blade and that is often referred to as a rain guard.
  3. (archaic) The piece by which an object is attached to something, such as the frog of a scabbard or the metal loop at the back of a buckle by which it is fastened to a strap.
    • 1862, United States. Army. Ordnance Department, The Ordnance Manual for the Use of the Officers of the United States Army, page 229:
      SABRE-BELT, ( black buff-leather.) — Length 36 to 40 inches, width 1.9 inch; 2 leather chapes sewed on the outside of the belt for attaching 2 brass loops  []
    • 1893, Saddlery and Harness, page 113:
      At the end of each point a buckle is attached by means of a leather chape, and it is to these buckles that the two  []

Translations

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References

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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Dutch

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French chape.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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chape m or f (plural chapes, diminutive chapeje n or chapeke n)

  1. (Belgium, construction) screed

Synonyms

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References

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French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old French chape, from Late Latin cappa. Doublet of cape.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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chape f (plural chapes)

  1. (archaic) cape, cloak
  2. (liturgy) cope, cappa (ceremonial cape)
    Synonym: pluvial
  3. (nautical) gin block
  4. tread (of tyre)
  5. (manufacturing) clevis
  6. screed
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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Galician

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Verb

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chape

  1. inflection of chapar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Haitian Creole

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Etymology

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From French échapper (to escape).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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chape

  1. escape
    • Haitian Creole Bible Jòb 1:14-15:
      Yon mesaje kouri vin jwenn Jòb, li di l' konsa: -Nou t'ap raboure tè ak bèf yo, fenmèl bourik yo t'ap manje toupre, lè yon bann moun Seba tonbe sou nou, yo pran tout bèt yo, yo touye tout moun ou yo. Se renk mwen menm ki resi chape vin di ou sa.

Middle English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Old French chape, from Latin cappa. Doublet of cappe and cope.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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chape (plural chapes)

  1. A metal cover or mounting, especially the chape of a scabbard.

Descendants

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  • English: chape

References

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Norman

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old French chapel, from Early Medieval Latin cappellus, diminutive from Late Latin cappa.

Noun

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chape m (plural chapes)

  1. (Sark) hat

Old French

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Late Latin cappa.

Noun

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chape oblique singularf (oblique plural chapes, nominative singular chape, nominative plural chapes)

  1. cape (sleeveless garment)
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Descendants

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Portuguese

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Verb

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chape

  1. inflection of chapar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Spanish

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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chape m (plural chapes)

  1. tress, braid

Etymology 2

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Verb

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chape

  1. inflection of chapar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Further reading

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