cape

See also: capé and çapë

Contents

EnglishEdit

Cape Cod.

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French cap, from Latin caput ‎(head).

NounEdit

cape ‎(plural capes)

  1. (geography) A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into a sea or lake; a promontory; a headland.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

From Old English capa, from Late Latin cappa ‎(cape).

A young woman in a crocheted cape.

NounEdit

cape ‎(plural capes)

  1. A sleeveless garment or part of a garment, hanging from the neck over the back, arms, and shoulders, but not reaching below the hips.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, An Autobiography, Part II, chapter4:
      Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

cape ‎(third-person singular simple present capes, present participle caping, simple past and past participle caped)

  1. (nautical) To head or point; to keep a course.
    The ship capes southwest by south.
  2. To skin an animal, particularly a deer.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English capen ‎(to stare, gape, look for, seek), from Old English capian ‎(to look), from Proto-Germanic *kapjaną. Cognate with German gaffen ‎(to stare at curiously, rubberneck), Low German gapen ‎(to stare).

VerbEdit

cape ‎(third-person singular simple present capes, present participle caping, simple past and past participle caped)

  1. (obsolete) To look for, search after.
    Long may they search ere that they find that they after cape.‎ (Geoffrey Chaucer)
  2. (rare, dialectal or obsolete) To gaze or stare.
    The captain just caped mindlessly into the distance as his ship was hit by volley after volley.
    This Nicholas ever caped upward into the air.‎ (Geoffrey Chaucer)
ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old Provençal capa, from Late Latin cappa (compare the inherited doublet chape; cf. also the Old Northern French variant cape).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cape f ‎(plural capes)

  1. cape

VerbEdit

cape

  1. first-person singular present indicative of caper
  2. third-person singular present indicative of caper
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of caper
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of caper
  5. second-person singular imperative of caper

External linksEdit


IndonesianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cape

  1. (slang) tired

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

cape f

  1. plural of capa

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NeapolitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cape f

  1. plural of capa

NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English cape, from French, from Medieval Latin . Cognate with kappe ‎(cloak), kåpe ‎(cloak)

NounEdit

cape m

  1. cape (sleeveless garment used by women)

InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “cape” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • cape” in The Ordnett Dictionary

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cape

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of capar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of capar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of capar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of capar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

cape

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of capar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of capar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of capar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of capar.

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

cape c

  1. cape (sleeveless garment used by women)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of cape 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative cape capeen capeer capeerna
Genitive capes capeens capeers capeernas
Read in another language