commence

See also: commencé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English commencen, comencen (also as contracted comsen, cumsen), from Anglo-Norman comencer, from Vulgar Latin *cominitiāre, formed from Latin com- + initiō (whence English initiate).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kəˈmɛns/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛns

VerbEdit

commence (third-person singular simple present commences, present participle commencing, simple past and past participle commenced)

  1. (intransitive) To begin, start.
  2. (transitive) To begin to be, or to act as.
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, p. 126,[3]
      [] he furnish’d me with a Gun, Cartouch-box, and Powder-horn, &c. and thus accouter’d I commenc’d Soldier.
    • 1825, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Aids to Reflection in the Formation of a Manly Character, London: Taylor & Hessey, Prudential Aphorisms, Aphorism 15, p. 48,[4]
      When we are wearied of the trouble of prosecuting crimes at the bar, we commence judges ourselves []
  3. (UK, intransitive, dated) To take a degree at a university.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, “The Seventh Century”, in James Nichols, editor, The Church History of Britain, [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), new edition, London: [] [James Nichols] for Thomas Tegg and Son, [], published 1837, OCLC 913056315, book, page 75:
      [] I question whether the Formality of Commencing was used in that Age: inclining rather to the negative, that such Distinction of Graduates was then unknown []
    • 1861, George John Gray, Athenae Cantabrigienses: 1586-1609 (page 272)
      [] was admitted a minor fellow of his college 4 Oct. 1591, a major fellow 11 March 1591-2, and commenced M.A. in 1592.

SynonymsEdit

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FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

commence

  1. inflection of commencer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Louisiana Creole FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French commencer (to commence), compare Haitian Creole kòmanse.

VerbEdit

commence

  1. to begin, commence

ReferencesEdit

  • Alcée Fortier, Louisiana Folktales