See also: Conte, conté, and Conté

English

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Etymology

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From Italian conte. Doublet of comes, comte, and count.

Noun

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conte (plural contes)

  1. An Italian count.
    Coordinate term: contessa
    • 1895 July 13, Charlotte M[ary] Yonge, “The Long Vacation”, in The Churchman: An Illustrated Weekly News-Magazine, volume LXXII, number 2 (whole 2634), New York, N.Y.: M. H. Mallory & Co., chapter XXVIII (Rocca Marina), page 52 (24), column 3:
      So she led the way through a marble hall, pillared in different colors, rich and rare, with portraits of ancient contes and contessas on the walls, up a magnificent stone stair with a carved balustrade, to a suite indeed, where, at the entrance, Sibby was found very happy at her welcome from Mrs. Mount, who was equally glad to receive a countrywoman.
    • 1986, Heather Graham Pozzessere, The Di Medici Bride, Silhouette Intimate Moments, →ISBN, page 130:
      “Aspirin. It will help you to sleep tonight if you have aches and pains, or cold clammy dreams about dead contes and contessas,” he teased.
    • 2006, Mark Lamster, Spalding’s World Tour: The Epic Adventure That Took Baseball Around the Globe—and Made It America’s Game, PublicAffairs™, →ISBN:
      The announcement of the game had put Florentine society “in a flurry,” and two thousand spectators—including enough contes and contessas to fill half the palaces of Florence—made the trip beyond the city limits to view the match.

Aragonese

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Etymology

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From Latin comitem (the 'o' being stressed and the 'i' disappearing), accusative of comes (companion). Ultimately cognate to English count (nobility).

Noun

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conte m (feminine contesa)

  1. count (nobility); countess in the feminine sense.
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Catalan

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin computus, or deverbal from contar.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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conte m (plural contes)

  1. tale; story
    Synonym: rondalla

Derived terms

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Further reading

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French

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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French  Wikisource has original text related to this entry:

Wikisource fr

Inherited from Middle French conte, from Old French conte, compte, derived from the verb conter, compter, or from Latin computus. See compte.

Noun

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conte m (plural contes)

  1. tale; story
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Japanese: コント (konto)

Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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conte

  1. inflection of conter:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

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Galician

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Verb

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conte

  1. inflection of contar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Italian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkon.te/
  • Rhymes: -onte
  • Hyphenation: cón‧te

Etymology 1

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From Latin comitem.

Noun

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conte m (plural conti, feminine contessa)

  1. count (rank)
  2. earl
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See also
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

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conte

  1. plural of conta

Further reading

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  • conte in Collins Italian-English Dictionary
  • conte in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)
  • conte in Aldo Gabrielli, Grandi Dizionario Italiano (Hoepli)
  • conte in garzantilinguistica.it – Garzanti Linguistica, De Agostini Scuola Spa
  • conte in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti, Olivetti Media Communication
  • conte in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams

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Latin

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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conte

  1. vocative singular of contus

Middle Dutch

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Etymology

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From Old Dutch *kunta (vagina), from Proto-Germanic *kuntǭ.

Noun

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conte f

  1. vagina, also generally sex organ

Descendants

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Further reading

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Middle English

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Noun

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conte

  1. Alternative form of cunte

Middle French

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Etymology 1

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From Old French conte, compte.

Noun

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conte f (plural contes)

  1. story; tale; fable

Etymology 2

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From Old French comte.

Noun

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conte m (plural contes)

  1. count (nobleman)
Descendants
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Old French

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Alternative forms

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Etymology 1

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First attested circa 980 as compte. Deverbal of conter.[1]

Noun

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conte oblique singularm (oblique plural contes, nominative singular contes, nominative plural conte)

  1. story; tale; fable
  2. count (record of a number or amount)
    • 12th Century, Unknown, Raoul de Cambrai:
      Tant en asamble n'en sai conte tenir.
      He got together so many that I can't keep count

References

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  1. ^ Etymology and history of compte”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.

Etymology 2

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See comte.

Noun

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conte oblique singularm (oblique plural contes, nominative singular cuens, nominative plural conte)

  1. Alternative form of comte

Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: con‧te

Verb

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conte

  1. inflection of contar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French comte.

Noun

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conte m (plural conți, feminine equivalent contesă)

  1. count, earl

Declension

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