EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, borrowed from Old French fable, from Latin fābula, from fārī (to speak, say) + -bula (instrumental suffix). See ban, and compare fabulous, fame. Doublet of fabula.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: fā′bəl, IPA(key): /ˈfeɪbəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪbəl
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ble

NounEdit

fable (plural fables)

  1. A fictitious narrative intended to enforce some useful truth or precept, usually with animals, etc. as characters; an apologue. Prototypically, Aesop's Fables.
    Synonym: morality play
  2. Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk.
    Synonym: legend
  3. Fiction; untruth; falsehood.
  4. The plot, story, or connected series of events forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem.
    • 1695, John Dryden, A Parallel betwixt Painting and Poetry:
      For the moral (as Bossu observes,) is the first business of the poet, as being the groundwork of his instruction. This being formed, he contrives such a design, or fable, as may be most suitable to the moral;

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

fable (third-person singular simple present fables, present participle fabling, simple past and past participle fabled)

  1. (intransitive, archaic) To compose fables; hence, to write or speak fiction; to write or utter what is not true.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The First Part of Henry the Sixt”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene ii], page 111, column 2:
      He Fables not, I heare the enemie: / Out ſome light Horſemen, and peruſe their Wings.
    • 1709, Mat[thew] Prior, “An Ode, Humbly Inscrib’d to the Queen”, in Poems on Several Occasions, 2nd edition, London: [] Jacob Tonson [], OCLC 1103119849, stanza XVII, page 287:
      Vain now the Tales which fab’ling Poets tell, / That wav’ring Conqueſt ſtill deſires to rove; / In Marlbrô’s Camp the Goddeſs knows to dwell: / Long as the Hero’s Life remains her Love.
    • 1852, Matthew Arnold, Empedocles on Etna, Act II, in Empedocles on Etna and Other Poems, London: B. Fellowes, p. 50,[1]
      He fables, yet speaks truth.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To make up; to devise, and speak of, as true or real; to tell of falsely; to recount in the form of a fable.
    Synonyms: make up, invent, feign, devise
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book VI”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554, lines 288–292:
      [] erre not that ſo ſhall end / The ſtrife of Glorie: which we mean to win, / Or turn this Heav’n itſelf into the Hell / Thou fableſt []
    • 1691, “Cassandra, or, Divination”, in Arthur Gorges, transl., The Wisdom of the Ancients, London, translation of [De Sapientia Veterum] by Francis Bacon, page 1:
      THE Poets Fable, That Apollo being enamoured of Caſſandra, was by her many ſhifts and cunning ſlights ſtill deluded in his Deſire []
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[Episode 2: Nestor]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483, part I [Telemachia], page 24:
      Fabled by the daughters of memory. And yet it was in some way if not as memory fabled it. A phrase, then, of impatience, thud of Blake’s wings of excess.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French fable, borrowed from Latin fabula.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fable f (plural fables)

  1. fable, story

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun fabel, ultimately from Latin fabula, from fā(rī) (to speak, say) + -bula (instrumental suffix).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fable (imperative fabl or fable, present tense fabler, passive fables, simple past and past participle fabla or fablet)

  1. to fantasize, dream
    fable om suksess
    dream about success

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun fabel, ultimately from Latin fabula, from fā(rī) (to speak, say) + -bula (instrumental suffix).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fable (imperative fabl, present tense fablar, simple past and past participle fabla)

  1. to fantasize, dream
    fable om suksess
    dream about success
  2. to make up (something)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin fabula.

NounEdit

fable f (oblique plural fables, nominative singular fable, nominative plural fables)

  1. fable, story

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Dutch: fabele
  • Middle English: fable
  • Middle French: fable

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

fable

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fablar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fablar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fablar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of fablar.