conviction

Contents

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Anglo-Norman conviction, from Latin convictiō, from convictus, the past participle of convincō ‎(to convict).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

conviction ‎(plural convictions)

  1. (countable) A firmly held belief.
  2. (countable) A judgement of guilt in a court of law.
    • 2011 December 14, Steven Morris, “Devon woman jailed for 168 days for killing kitten in microwave”, in Guardian[1]:
      He said Robins had not been in trouble with the law before and had no previous convictions. Jail would have an adverse effect on her and her three children as she was the main carer.
  3. (uncountable) The state of being found or proved guilty.
  4. (uncountable) The state of being convinced.
    • 2013, Daniel Taylor, Rickie Lambert's debut goal gives England victory over Scotland (in The Guardian, 14 August 2013)[2]
      The visitors were being pinned back by the end of the first half. Yet Gordon Strachan's side played with great conviction and always had a chance of springing a surprise when their opponents were so susceptible at the back.

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.vik.sjɔ̃/
  • (file)
  • Homophone: convictions
  • Hyphenation: con‧vic‧tion

NounEdit

conviction f ‎(plural convictions)

  1. conviction

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