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TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

dom

  1. (mathematics) domain

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From shortening of dominator or dominate.

NounEdit

dom (plural doms)

  1. A dominator (in sadomasochistic sexual practices), especially a male one.
SynonymsEdit
  • (dominator): domme (female)

VerbEdit

dom (third-person singular simple present doms, present participle domming, simple past and past participle dommed)

  1. (slang, online gaming or BDSM) to dominate
    • 2006, Bitch: feminist response to pop culture (issues 31-34)
      Nola is actually "Nurse Nola," a dominatrix who specializes in medical role playing. [] "After that," she continues, "I started domming, which I did for a long time, but have never liked much.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

dom (plural doms)

  1. A title anciently given to the pope, and later to other church dignitaries and some monastic orders.

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Portuguese dom.

NounEdit

dom (plural doms or dons)

  1. A title formerly borne by member of the high nobility of Portugal and Brazil

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse dómr (judgement), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dom c (singular definite dommen, plural indefinite domme)

  1. sentence
  2. conviction
  3. judgement
  4. verdict
  5. (logic) proposition
  6. decision
  7. damnation, doom

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch dom, from Old Dutch dumb, from Proto-Germanic *dumbaz.

AdjectiveEdit

dom (comparative dommer, superlative domst)

  1. dumb, brainless
  2. stupid, silly
InflectionEdit
Inflection of dom
uninflected dom
inflected domme
comparative dommer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial dom dommer het domst
het domste
indefinite m./f. sing. domme dommere domste
n. sing. dom dommer domste
plural domme dommere domste
definite domme dommere domste
partitive doms dommers
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch doem, from Latin domus (house, building), from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build). Cf. Old Dutch duom.

NounEdit

dom m (plural dommen, diminutive dommetje n) (only domkerken,domkerkje)

  1. domkerk, either an episcopal cathedral or another major church (often a basilica) which has been granted this high rank
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin dominus (master), from Latin domus (house, building), from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

NounEdit

dom m (plural dommen, diminutive dommetje n)

  1. ecclesiastical form of address, notably for a Benedictine priest
  2. nobleman or clergyman in certain Catholic countries, notably Portugal and its colonies
See alsoEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

dom m (plural dommen, diminutive dommetje n)

  1. Archaic form of duim (thumb, pivot)
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Italian don or older dom, from Latin dominus (master). Cognate with English don.

NounEdit

dom m (plural doms)

  1. title of respect given to certain monks and other religious figures

Further readingEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

dōm

  1. Romanization of 𐌳𐍉𐌼

IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish dom.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

dom (emphatic domsa)

  1. first-person singular of do (to/for me)

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

ContractionEdit

dom (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster) Contraction of do mo (to my, for my).
    Thugas an féirín dom mháthair.
    I gave the present to my mother.
Related termsEdit

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

dom m (invariable)

  1. dominant, top (dominating BDSM partner)

See alsoEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dom m (diminutive domk)

  1. house

DeclensionEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch dumb, from Proto-Germanic *dumbaz.

AdjectiveEdit

dom

  1. dumb, unwise, stupid

InflectionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • domb”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • domp”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse dómr (judgement), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos.

NounEdit

dom m (definite singular dommen, indefinite plural dommer, definite plural dommene)

  1. judgement, sentence

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse dómr (judgement).

NounEdit

dom m (definite singular dommen, indefinite plural dommar, definite plural dommane)

  1. judgement, sentence

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos. Cognate with Old Frisian dōm, Old Saxon dōm, Old High German tuom, Old Norse dómr, Gothic 𐌳𐍉𐌼𐍃 (doms). The Germanic source was from a stem verb originally meaning ‘to place, to set’ (a sense-development also found in Latin statutum, Ancient Greek θέμις).

NounEdit

dōm m

  1. law, statute
  2. judgement
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *dōmi, first-person singular of *dōną (to do).

VerbEdit

dōm

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dōn

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin de + unde

PronounEdit

dom

  1. of whom; of which

DescendantsEdit


Old IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

do (to, for) + (me)

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

dom

  1. first-person singular of do: to/for me
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from the root *dem- (to build).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dom ?

  1. home
  2. house
InflectionEdit
Unknown gender u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative
Vocative
Accusative
Genitive
Dative
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Scottish Gaelic: domh

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dom m inan

  1. home
    Idę do domu. – I'm going home.

NounEdit

dom m (diminutive domek)

  1. house (building)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • Nouns
  • Adjectives

Further readingEdit

  • dom in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (obsolete, abbreviation)

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese don, from Latin donum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dom m (plural dons)

  1. gift
  2. talent

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French dôme.

NounEdit

dom n (plural domuri)

  1. dome

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dȏm m (Cyrillic spelling до̑м)

  1. home, house

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dom m (genitive singular domu, nominative plural domy, genitive plural domov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. house

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • dom in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dóm m inan (genitive dóma, nominative plural domôvi or dómi)

  1. home (house or structure in which someone lives)
  2. in phrase:
    zdravstveni dóm - health centre
    gasilski dóm - fire station
    študentski dóm - hall of residence
    dom starejših občanov - retirement home

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse dómr (judgement), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos.

NounEdit

dom c

  1. (law) conviction, judgement of court, sentence, verdict, doom
  2. doomsday, the final judgement
    domedagen
    judgement day
DeclensionEdit
Declension of dom 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative dom domen domar domarna
Genitive doms domens domars domarnas
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin domus.

NounEdit

dom c

  1. dome
DeclensionEdit
Declension of dom 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative dom domen domer domerna
Genitive doms domens domers domernas

Etymology 3Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Alternative formsEdit

  • de (nominative case)
  • di (nominative case, strongly dialectal)
  • dem (objective case)

PronounEdit

dom

  1. (colloquial) they, them
Usage notesEdit

In informal language it can be found, that de is pronounced "dom" when reading texts aloud.

AnagramsEdit


VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Sino-Vietnamese word from

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dom

  1. anus, prolapse of the rectum


VolapükEdit

NounEdit

dom (plural doms)

  1. house

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit