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EnglishEdit

 
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A cornet (musical instrument).

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English cornet, from Old French cornet, a diminutive of a popular reflex of Latin cornū (horn).

NounEdit

cornet (plural cornets)

  1. A musical instrument of the brass family, slightly smaller than a trumpet, usually in the musical key of B-flat.
    Synonyms: cornet-à-piston, cornet-à-pistons
  2. A piece of paper twisted to be used as a container.
  3. A pastry shell to be filled with ice-cream, hence (Britain, dated) an ice cream cone.
  4. (obsolete) A troop of cavalry; so called from its being accompanied by a cornet player.
    • Clarendon
      A body of five cornets of horse.
  5. A kind of organ stop.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French cornette, diminutive of corne, from Latin cornua (horns).

NounEdit

cornet (plural cornets)

  1. The white headdress worn by the Sisters of Charity.
  2. (obsolete) The standard flown by a cavalry troop.
  3. (historical) The fifth commissioned officer in a cavalry troop, who carried the colours (equivalent to the ensign in infantry).
    • 1972, Christopher Hill, The World Turned Upside Down, Folio Society, published 2016, page 45:
      No general would have sent a mere cornet in command of five hundred horse: Fairfax despatched a colonel to take charge as soon as he heard what had happened.
    • 1999, Mike Mitchell, translating HJC von Grimmelshausen, Simplicissimus, III.14, Dedalus 2016, p. 253:
      This cornet [transl. Cornet] was a brave young cavalier and not more than two years older than me.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From corne +‎ -et.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cornet m (plural cornets)

  1. (paper) cone
  2. (pastry) horn; (ice-cream) cone
  3. post horn
    • 2000, Jean-François Parot, L'énigme des Blancs-Manteaux, JC Lattès 2012, p. 17:
      Il tenait à la main gauche un cornet semblable à celui dont usaient les postillons ; en cas de péril, l'alarme serait donnée au patron qui tenait la barre à l'arrière.
      In his left hand he held a horn like those used by post riders; in case of danger, the alarm would be given to the owner who was at the forward rail.
  4. (music) cornet; cornet stop (on organ)
  5. portable inkhorn
  6. (Switzerland) plastic bag

DescendantsEdit

  • English: cornet

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French cornet; equivalent to corne (callus) +‎ -et.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔrnit/, /ˈkɔrnɛt/

NounEdit

cornet (plural cornettes)

  1. A cornet (musical instrument).
  2. (rare) A triangle-shaped slice of bread.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit