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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish corral.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corral (plural corrals)

  1. An enclosure for livestock, especially a circular one.
    We had a small corral out back where we kept our pet llama.
  2. An enclosure or area to concentrate a dispersed group.
    Please return the shopping carts to the corral.
  3. A circle of wagons, either for the purpose of trapping livestock, or for defense.
    The wagon train formed a corral to protect against Comanche attacks.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • crawl (Jamaican English)
  • kraal (South African English)

VerbEdit

corral (third-person singular simple present corrals, present participle corralling or (US) corraling, simple past and past participle corralled or (US) corraled)

  1. To capture or round up.
    The lawyer frantically tried to corral his notes as his briefcase fell open.
    Between us, we managed to corral the puppy in the kitchen.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
      I corralled the judge, and we started off across the fields, in no very mild state of fear of that gentleman's wife, whose vigilance was seldom relaxed. And thus we came by a circuitous route to Mohair, the judge occupied by his own guilty thoughts, and I by others not less disturbing.
  2. To place inside of a corral.
    After we corralled the last steer, we headed off to the chuck wagon for dinner.
  3. To make a circle of vehicles, as of wagons so as to form a corral.
    The cattle drivers corralled their wagons for the night.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *currale (place for keeping a chariot), from currus (chariot).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corral m (plural corrales)

  1. (cattle) corral, enclosure
    pollos de corralfree-range chickens

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit