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See also: häkä

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
Maori warriors performing a haka at a pōhiri ceremony to welcome United States Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta when he visited Auckland, New Zealand, on 21 September 2012

Borrowed from Maori haka, from Proto-Polynesian *saka, from Proto-Oceanic *sanga. The word is cognate with Hawaiian haʻa (dance), Mangarevan ʻaka (to perform a traditional dance; a usually warlike dance accompanied by a chant), Rarotongan ʻaka (dance), Samoan saʻa (dance), Tokelauan haka (dance), Tongan haka (hand action made while singing).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

haka (plural hakas or haka)

  1. A group dance of New Zealand's Maori people featuring rhythmic chanting, vigorous facial and arm movements, and foot stamping. Traditionally a war dance, today it is also performed to welcome guests, as a mark of respect at occasions such as commemorations and funerals, as a challenge to opposing teams at sports events, and for artistic purposes.
    • 1838, J[oel] S[amuel] Polack, chapter III, in New Zealand: Being a Narrative of Travels and Adventures during a Residence in that Country between the Years 1831 and 1837. [...] In Two Volumes, volume I, London: Richard Bentley, New Burlington Street, publisher in ordinary to Her Majesty, OCLC 1003989957, page 81:
      After each of my retinue were presented to the chief, partaking of the honour of the ougi, or salutation, the hákà, or dance of welcome, was performed; this was commenced by our entertainers, who placed themselves in an extended line, in ranks four deep. This dance, to a stranger witnessing it for the first time, is calculated to excite the most alarming fears; []
    • 1876 January, “A Week among the Maoris of Lake Taupo”, in The Cornhill Magazine, volume XXXIII, number 193, London: Smith, Elder & Co., 15 Waterloo Place, OCLC 561748243, page 65:
      A "Haka" is the native dance, answering to the corroboree of the Australian aboriginals, and we were anxious to see it. [] Later in the evening, however, the complaisant Herekiekie entertained a small and select party at a "Haka" in his "whare" or house (pronounced wharry). It was exactly what I expected. The performers, all male, stood in a row, one, slightly advanced, acting as fugleman. They shouted and gesticulated with the most hideous and revolting gestures, grimaces, and yells.
    • 1986, Sylvia Ashton-Warner, “Life in a Maori School”, in Teacher (A Touchstone Book), 1st Touchstone edition, New York, N.Y.: Simon & Schuster, →ISBN, pages 198 and 200:
      [T]he children might get up and dance in the middle of their sums. Matawhero might stand up and lead a haka if I'm not careful. Oh dear.
    • 2011 October 23, Tom Fordyce, “2011 Rugby World Cup Final: New Zealand 8 – 7 France”, in BBC Sport[1], archived from the original on 3 April 2017:
      An already febrile atmosphere within the ground before the start had been stoked still further when France's players formed an arrow formation to face down the haka, and then advanced slowly over halfway as the capacity crowd roared.
    • 2013, Matt J. Rossano, “Mountain Rituals”, in Mortal Rituals: What the Story of the Andes Survivors Tells Us about Human Evolution, New York, N.Y.; Chichester, West Sussex: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, pages 105–106:
      The Maori haka ritual has been made famous by the All Blacks, New Zealand's national rugby team. Before each match, the All Blacks face their opponents and engage in a synchronized display of hand-slapping, feet-stomping, chest-pumping, tongue-wagging, and eye-popping chanting and dancing designed to intimidate their opponents. The All Blacks' version of the haka is called ka-mate, a war haka or peruperu. [] But hakas are not restricted to war; they are also used as a welcome to strangers, as part of a funeral, or as part of various celebrations and ceremonies.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

haka (third-person singular simple present hakas, present participle hakaing, simple past and past participle hakaed)

  1. (intransitive) To perform the haka.
    • 1870, Richard Taylor, “Traditions and Legends. (Continued.) [The Story of Tama te Kapua, and His Brother Wakaturia.]”, in Te Ika a Maui; or, New Zealand and Its Inhabitants. Illustrating the Origin, Manners, Customs, Mythology, Religion, Rites, Songs, Proverbs, Fables, and Language of the Maori and Polynesian Races in General; together with the Geology, Natural History, Productions, and Climate of the Country, 2nd edition, London: William Macintosh, 24, Paternoster Row; Wanganui, New Zealand: H. Ireson Jones, OCLC 57701969, page 274:
      [T]hey hoisted him up to the ridge pole and lighted the fire; they began to haka, when they were tired of that they sang songs, []
    • 1888, John White, “Hotu-nui. (Nga-ti-maru.)”, in The Ancient History of the Maori, His Mythology and Traditions. Tai-Nui, volume IV, Wellington: By authority; George Didsbury, government printer, OCLC 918356820, pages 213–214:
      [page 213] The haka is one of the Maori's most honourable games that can be performed to entertain strangers; and when such is played it is a sign of a people of chiefs and days of peace. The people played this game to her that Te-kahu-rere-moa might haka and entertain them, that they might see how beautifully she could haka. [] [page 214] She hakaed for some time, and all the people were quite in love with her.
    • 2011, Glyn Harper, editor, Letters from Gallipoli: New Zealand Soldiers Write Home[2], Auckland: Auckland University Press, →ISBN:
      We captured the trenches midst our hakas and cheering. The other party did well, we could hear them on the opposite hill cheering, and hakaing as they went along.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

From Maori haka.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦaka]
  • Rhymes: -aka
  • Hyphenation: ha‧ka

NounEdit

haka f

  1. haka (dance of New Zealand's Maori people featuring rhythmic chanting, vigorous facial and arm movements, and foot stamping.)
    • 2015 September 22, Pavel Jahoda, “Nejenom haka straší na MS soupeře. K vidění jsou i sipi tau či bole”, in ČT sport[3]:
      Haka k Novému Zélandu a některým jeho sportovním týmům neodmyslitelně patří, ale nejznámější je ve spojení právě s ragby. Sport známý svou tvrdostí získává slavným tancem, při němž hráči používají všemožné grimasy včetně vyplazování jazyka, tleskají, plácají se po stehnech a rytmicky zpívají, kouzlo, které uchvátilo davy fanoušků po celém světě.
      Haka is inseparable from rugby. The sport, which is known for rough play, gets another charm thanks to the dance, during which the players use various facial expressions including sticking out their tongues, clap their hands and slap their thighs.

DeclensionEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Germanic language, compare Haken.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

haka

  1. hook, clasp (type of fastener)
  2. corral, paddock, croft (enclosure for livestock)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of haka (Kotus type 9/kala, k- gradation)
nominative haka haat
genitive haan hakojen
partitive hakaa hakoja
illative hakaan hakoihin
singular plural
nominative haka haat
accusative nom. haka haat
gen. haan
genitive haan hakojen
hakainrare
partitive hakaa hakoja
inessive haassa haoissa
elative haasta haoista
illative hakaan hakoihin
adessive haalla haoilla
ablative haalta haoilta
allative haalle haoille
essive hakana hakoina
translative haaksi haoiksi
instructive haoin
abessive haatta haoitta
comitative hakoineen

AdverbEdit

haka

  1. olla haka jossakin: to be good at something

AnagramsEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse haka

NounEdit

haka f (genitive singular höku, nominative plural hökur)

  1. (anatomy) chin
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

haka (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative hakaði, supine hakað)

  1. to pick with a pickaxe
  2. to mark with a check mark (usually with the preposition við)
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

haka

  1. indefinite accusative singular of haki
  2. indefinite dative singular of haki
  3. indefinite genitive singular of haki
  4. indefinite accusative plural of haki
  5. indefinite genitive plural of haki

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

haka

  1. Rōmaji transcription of はか

KashubianEdit

NounEdit

haka f

  1. hook

KikuyuEdit

EtymologyEdit

Hinde (1904) records kuhaka as an equivalent of English paint in “Jogowini dialect” of Kikuyu.[1]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

haka (infinitive kũhaka)

  1. to paint, to smear[2][3]
  2. to propitiate by gift[3]
  3. to bribe[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hinde, Hildegarde (1904). Vocabularies of the Kamba and Kikuyu languages of East Africa, pp. 44–45. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Armstrong, Lilias E. (1940). The Phonetic and Tonal Structure of Kikuyu, p. 361. Rep. 1967. (Also in 2018 by Routledge).
  3. 3.0 3.1 Barlow, A. Ruffell (1960). Studies in Kikuyu Grammar and Idiom, pp. 64, 229.

MaoriEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *saka, from Proto-Oceanic *sanga; compare Fijian caga.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

haka

  1. A war dance; a haka.

Usage notesEdit

Used in the form haka-a.


NamaEdit

NumeralEdit

haka

  1. four

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

haka m, f

  1. definite feminine singular of hake (Etymology 1)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

haka f

  1. definite singular of hake (Etymology 1)

PolishEdit

NounEdit

haka m

  1. genitive singular of hak

Rapa NuiEdit

VerbEdit

haka

  1. to do

Derived termsEdit


Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

haka f (genitive hǫku)

  1. chin

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

haka in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press



SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse haka.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

haka c

  1. chin, lower part of face

DeclensionEdit

Declension of haka 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative haka hakan hakor hakorna
Genitive hakas hakans hakors hakornas

See alsoEdit