See also: hakā, háka, häkä, and håkå

English edit

Etymology edit

 
Maori warriors performing a haka at a pōhiri ceremony to welcome United States Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta when he visited Auckland, New Zealand, on 21 September 2012

Borrowed from Maori haka, from Proto-Polynesian *saka, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *sakaŋ. The word is cognate with Hawaiian haʻa (dance), Mangarevan ʻaka (to perform a traditional dance; a usually warlike dance accompanied by a chant), Rarotongan ʻaka (dance), Samoan saʻa (dance), Tokelauan haka (dance), Tongan haka (hand action made while singing).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

haka (plural hakas or haka)

  1. A group dance of New Zealand's Maori people featuring rhythmic chanting, vigorous facial and arm movements, and foot stamping. Traditionally a war dance, today it is also performed to welcome guests, as a mark of respect at occasions such as commemorations and funerals, as a challenge to opposing teams at sports events, and for artistic purposes.
    • 1838, J[oel] S[amuel] Polack, chapter III, in New Zealand: Being a Narrative of Travels and Adventures during a Residence in that Country between the Years 1831 and 1837. [...] In Two Volumes, volume I, London: Richard Bentley, New Burlington Street, publisher in ordinary to Her Majesty, →OCLC, page 81:
      After each of my retinue were presented to the chief, partaking of the honour of the ougi, or salutation, the hákà, or dance of welcome, was performed; this was commenced by our entertainers, who placed themselves in an extended line, in ranks four deep. This dance, to a stranger witnessing it for the first time, is calculated to excite the most alarming fears; []
    • 1876 January, “A Week among the Maoris of Lake Taupo”, in The Cornhill Magazine, volume XXXIII, number 193, London: Smith, Elder & Co., 15 Waterloo Place, →OCLC, page 65:
      A "Haka" is the native dance, answering to the corroboree of the Australian aboriginals, and we were anxious to see it. [] Later in the evening, however, the complaisant Herekiekie entertained a small and select party at a "Haka" in his "whare" or house (pronounced wharry). It was exactly what I expected. The performers, all male, stood in a row, one, slightly advanced, acting as fugleman. They shouted and gesticulated with the most hideous and revolting gestures, grimaces, and yells.
    • 1986, Sylvia Ashton-Warner, “Life in a Maori School”, in Teacher (A Touchstone Book), 1st Touchstone edition, New York, N.Y.: Simon & Schuster, →ISBN, pages 198 and 200:
      [T]he children might get up and dance in the middle of their sums. Matawhero might stand up and lead a haka if I'm not careful. Oh dear.
    • 2011 October 23, Tom Fordyce, “2011 Rugby World Cup Final: New Zealand 8 – 7 France”, in BBC Sport[1], archived from the original on 3 April 2017:
      An already febrile atmosphere within the ground before the start had been stoked still further when France's players formed an arrow formation to face down the haka, and then advanced slowly over halfway as the capacity crowd roared.
    • 2013, Matt J. Rossano, “Mountain Rituals”, in Mortal Rituals: What the Story of the Andes Survivors Tells Us about Human Evolution, New York, N.Y., Chichester, West Sussex: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, pages 105–106:
      The Maori haka ritual has been made famous by the All Blacks, New Zealand's national rugby team. Before each match, the All Blacks face their opponents and engage in a synchronized display of hand-slapping, feet-stomping, chest-pumping, tongue-wagging, and eye-popping chanting and dancing designed to intimidate their opponents. The All Blacks' version of the haka is called ka-mate, a war haka or peruperu. [] But hakas are not restricted to war; they are also used as a welcome to strangers, as part of a funeral, or as part of various celebrations and ceremonies.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

haka (third-person singular simple present hakas, present participle hakaing, simple past and past participle hakaed)

  1. (intransitive) To perform the haka.
    • 1870, Richard Taylor, “Traditions and Legends. (Continued.) [The Story of Tama te Kapua, and His Brother Wakaturia.]”, in Te Ika a Maui; or, New Zealand and Its Inhabitants. Illustrating the Origin, Manners, Customs, Mythology, Religion, Rites, Songs, Proverbs, Fables, and Language of the Maori and Polynesian Races in General; together with the Geology, Natural History, Productions, and Climate of the Country, 2nd edition, London: William Macintosh, 24, Paternoster Row; Wanganui, New Zealand: H. Ireson Jones, →OCLC, page 274:
      [T]hey hoisted him up to the ridge pole and lighted the fire; they began to haka, when they were tired of that they sang songs, []
    • 1888, John White, “Hotu-nui. (Nga-ti-maru.)”, in The Ancient History of the Maori, His Mythology and Traditions. Tai-Nui, volume IV, Wellington: By authority; George Didsbury, government printer, →OCLC, pages 213–214:
      [page 213] The haka is one of the Maori's most honourable games that can be performed to entertain strangers; and when such is played it is a sign of a people of chiefs and days of peace. The people played this game to her that Te-kahu-rere-moa might haka and entertain them, that they might see how beautifully she could haka. [] [page 214] She hakaed for some time, and all the people were quite in love with her.
    • 2011, Glyn Harper, editor, Letters from Gallipoli: New Zealand Soldiers Write Home[2], Auckland: Auckland University Press, →ISBN:
      We captured the trenches midst our hakas and cheering. The other party did well, we could hear them on the opposite hill cheering, and hakaing as they went along.

Translations edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

'Are'are edit

Noun edit

haka

  1. boat

References edit

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Maori haka.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦaka]
  • Rhymes: -aka
  • Hyphenation: ha‧ka

Noun edit

haka f

  1. haka (dance of New Zealand's Maori people featuring rhythmic chanting, vigorous facial and arm movements, and foot stamping.)
    • 2015 September 22, Pavel Jahoda, “Nejenom haka straší na MS soupeře. K vidění jsou i sipi tau či bole”, in ČT sport[3]:
      Haka k Novému Zélandu a některým jeho sportovním týmům neodmyslitelně patří, ale nejznámější je ve spojení právě s ragby. Sport známý svou tvrdostí získává slavným tancem, při němž hráči používají všemožné grimasy včetně vyplazování jazyka, tleskají, plácají se po stehnech a rytmicky zpívají, kouzlo, které uchvátilo davy fanoušků po celém světě.
      Haka is inseparable from rugby. The sport, which is known for rough play, gets another charm thanks to the dance, during which the players use various facial expressions including sticking out their tongues, clap their hands and slap their thighs.

Declension edit

Finnish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɑkɑ/, [ˈhɑ̝kɑ̝]
  • Rhymes: -ɑkɑ
  • Syllabification(key): ha‧ka

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from dialectal Swedish haka (compare standard hake).

Noun edit

haka

  1. hook, clasp (type of fastener)
Declension edit
Inflection of haka (Kotus type 9*D/kala, k- gradation)
nominative haka haat
genitive haan hakojen
partitive hakaa hakoja
illative hakaan hakoihin
singular plural
nominative haka haat
accusative nom. haka haat
gen. haan
genitive haan hakojen
hakainrare
partitive hakaa hakoja
inessive haassa haoissa
elative haasta haoista
illative hakaan hakoihin
adessive haalla haoilla
ablative haalta haoilta
allative haalle haoille
essive hakana hakoina
translative haaksi haoiksi
abessive haatta haoitta
instructive haoin
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of haka (Kotus type 9*D/kala, k- gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative hakani hakani
accusative nom. hakani hakani
gen. hakani
genitive hakani hakojeni
hakainirare
partitive hakaani hakojani
inessive haassani haoissani
elative haastani haoistani
illative hakaani hakoihini
adessive haallani haoillani
ablative haaltani haoiltani
allative haalleni haoilleni
essive hakanani hakoinani
translative haakseni haoikseni
abessive haattani haoittani
instructive
comitative hakoineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative hakasi hakasi
accusative nom. hakasi hakasi
gen. hakasi
genitive hakasi hakojesi
hakaisirare
partitive hakaasi hakojasi
inessive haassasi haoissasi
elative haastasi haoistasi
illative hakaasi hakoihisi
adessive haallasi haoillasi
ablative haaltasi haoiltasi
allative haallesi haoillesi
essive hakanasi hakoinasi
translative haaksesi haoiksesi
abessive haattasi haoittasi
instructive
comitative hakoinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative hakamme hakamme
accusative nom. hakamme hakamme
gen. hakamme
genitive hakamme hakojemme
hakaimmerare
partitive hakaamme hakojamme
inessive haassamme haoissamme
elative haastamme haoistamme
illative hakaamme hakoihimme
adessive haallamme haoillamme
ablative haaltamme haoiltamme
allative haallemme haoillemme
essive hakanamme hakoinamme
translative haaksemme haoiksemme
abessive haattamme haoittamme
instructive
comitative hakoinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative hakanne hakanne
accusative nom. hakanne hakanne
gen. hakanne
genitive hakanne hakojenne
hakainnerare
partitive hakaanne hakojanne
inessive haassanne haoissanne
elative haastanne haoistanne
illative hakaanne hakoihinne
adessive haallanne haoillanne
ablative haaltanne haoiltanne
allative haallenne haoillenne
essive hakananne hakoinanne
translative haaksenne haoiksenne
abessive haattanne haoittanne
instructive
comitative hakoinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative hakansa hakansa
accusative nom. hakansa hakansa
gen. hakansa
genitive hakansa hakojensa
hakainsarare
partitive hakaansa hakojaan
hakojansa
inessive haassaan
haassansa
haoissaan
haoissansa
elative haastaan
haastansa
haoistaan
haoistansa
illative hakaansa hakoihinsa
adessive haallaan
haallansa
haoillaan
haoillansa
ablative haaltaan
haaltansa
haoiltaan
haoiltansa
allative haalleen
haallensa
haoilleen
haoillensa
essive hakanaan
hakanansa
hakoinaan
hakoinansa
translative haakseen
haaksensa
haoikseen
haoiksensa
abessive haattaan
haattansa
haoittaan
haoittansa
instructive
comitative hakoineen
hakoinensa
Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

Probably borrowed from Old Swedish hagha, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hagô (enclosure, yard; pasture).

Noun edit

haka

  1. corral, paddock, croft (enclosure for livestock)
Declension edit
Inflection of haka (Kotus type 9*D/kala, k- gradation)
nominative haka haat
genitive haan hakojen
partitive hakaa hakoja
illative hakaan hakoihin
singular plural
nominative haka haat
accusative nom. haka haat
gen. haan
genitive haan hakojen
hakainrare
partitive hakaa hakoja
inessive haassa haoissa
elative haasta haoista
illative hakaan hakoihin
adessive haalla haoilla
ablative haalta haoilta
allative haalle haoille
essive hakana hakoina
translative haaksi haoiksi
abessive haatta haoitta
instructive haoin
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of haka (Kotus type 9*D/kala, k- gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative hakani hakani
accusative nom. hakani hakani
gen. hakani
genitive hakani hakojeni
hakainirare
partitive hakaani hakojani
inessive haassani haoissani
elative haastani haoistani
illative hakaani hakoihini
adessive haallani haoillani
ablative haaltani haoiltani
allative haalleni haoilleni
essive hakanani hakoinani
translative haakseni haoikseni
abessive haattani haoittani
instructive
comitative hakoineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative hakasi hakasi
accusative nom. hakasi hakasi
gen. hakasi
genitive hakasi hakojesi
hakaisirare
partitive hakaasi hakojasi
inessive haassasi haoissasi
elative haastasi haoistasi
illative hakaasi hakoihisi
adessive haallasi haoillasi
ablative haaltasi haoiltasi
allative haallesi haoillesi
essive hakanasi hakoinasi
translative haaksesi haoiksesi
abessive haattasi haoittasi
instructive
comitative hakoinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative hakamme hakamme
accusative nom. hakamme hakamme
gen. hakamme
genitive hakamme hakojemme
hakaimmerare
partitive hakaamme hakojamme
inessive haassamme haoissamme
elative haastamme haoistamme
illative hakaamme hakoihimme
adessive haallamme haoillamme
ablative haaltamme haoiltamme
allative haallemme haoillemme
essive hakanamme hakoinamme
translative haaksemme haoiksemme
abessive haattamme haoittamme
instructive
comitative hakoinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative hakanne hakanne
accusative nom. hakanne hakanne
gen. hakanne
genitive hakanne hakojenne
hakainnerare
partitive hakaanne hakojanne
inessive haassanne haoissanne
elative haastanne haoistanne
illative hakaanne hakoihinne
adessive haallanne haoillanne
ablative haaltanne haoiltanne
allative haallenne haoillenne
essive hakananne hakoinanne
translative haaksenne haoiksenne
abessive haattanne haoittanne
instructive
comitative hakoinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative hakansa hakansa
accusative nom. hakansa hakansa
gen. hakansa
genitive hakansa hakojensa
hakainsarare
partitive hakaansa hakojaan
hakojansa
inessive haassaan
haassansa
haoissaan
haoissansa
elative haastaan
haastansa
haoistaan
haoistansa
illative hakaansa hakoihinsa
adessive haallaan
haallansa
haoillaan
haoillansa
ablative haaltaan
haaltansa
haoiltaan
haoiltansa
allative haalleen
haallensa
haoilleen
haoillensa
essive hakanaan
hakanansa
hakoinaan
hakoinansa
translative haakseen
haaksensa
haoikseen
haoiksensa
abessive haattaan
haattansa
haoittaan
haoittansa
instructive
comitative hakoineen
hakoinensa
Derived terms edit
compounds

Further reading edit

Etymology 3 edit

From dialectal Swedish hake.

Adjective edit

haka (not comparable) (informal)

  1. (indeclinable) very good, skilled, masterful
Usage notes edit

Chiefly used in the verb phrase olla haka (+ inessive), meaning "to be (very) good at something, to be a master at". Only used predicatively in any case (never attributively).

Declension edit

Indeclinable.

Derived terms edit
compounds

Anagrams edit

Hadza edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

haka

  1. to go
    Synonym: etlhikwa

Hawaiian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *fata, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *pataʀ.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈha.ka/, [ˈhɐ.kə]

Noun edit

haka

  1. shelf
  2. platform

References edit

  • Pukui, Mary Kawena, Elbert, Samuel H. (1986) “haka”, in Hawaiian Dictionary, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press

Icelandic edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse haka.

Noun edit

haka f (genitive singular höku, nominative plural hökur)

  1. (anatomy) chin
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

See haki (pick)

Verb edit

haka (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative hakaði, supine hakað)

  1. to pick with a pickaxe
  2. to mark with a check mark (usually with the preposition við)
Conjugation edit

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

haka

  1. indefinite accusative singular of haki
  2. indefinite dative singular of haki
  3. indefinite genitive singular of haki
  4. indefinite accusative plural of haki
  5. indefinite genitive plural of haki

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

haka

  1. Rōmaji transcription of はか

Kashubian edit

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Noun edit

haka f

  1. hook

Khoekhoe edit

Khoekhoe cardinal numbers
 <  3 4 5  > 
    Cardinal : haka

Numeral edit

haka

  1. four

Kikuyu edit

Etymology edit

Hinde (1904) records kuhaka as an equivalent of English paint in “Jogowini dialect” of Kikuyu.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

haka (infinitive kũhaka)

  1. to paint, to smear[2][3]
  2. to propitiate by gift[3]
  3. to bribe[2]

References edit

  1. ^ Hinde, Hildegarde (1904). Vocabularies of the Kamba and Kikuyu languages of East Africa, pp. 44–45. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Armstrong, Lilias E. (1940). The Phonetic and Tonal Structure of Kikuyu, p. 361. Rep. 1967. (Also in 2018 by Routledge).
  3. 3.0 3.1 Barlow, A. Ruffell (1960). Studies in Kikuyu Grammar and Idiom, pp. 64, 229.

Maori edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *saka, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *sakaŋ. Word is cognate with Hawaiian haʻa (dance), Mangarevan ʻaka (to perform a traditional dance; a usually warlike dance accompanied by a chant), Rarotongan ʻaka (dance), Samoan saʻa (dance), Tokelauan haka (dance), Tongan haka (hand action made while singing).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈha.ka/, [ˈhɐ.kɐ]

Noun edit

haka

  1. A war dance; a haka.

Usage notes edit

Used in the form haka-a.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

  • peruperu (the proper term for the war dance)

Descendants edit

  • English: haka
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: haka
  • Czech: haka

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

haka c

  1. definite feminine singular of hake (Etymology 1)

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from English haka, from Maori haka.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

haka m (definite singular hakaen)

  1. haka dance

Etymology 2 edit

To the noun hake m.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

haka (present tense hakar, past tense haka, past participle haka, passive infinitive hakast, present participle hakande, imperative haka/hak)

  1. a-infinitive and split infinitive form of hake

Etymology 3 edit

From Old Norse haka f.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

haka f

  1. definite singular of hake (chin)
  2. (pre-2012) alternative form of hake

Etymology 4 edit

H-insertion on ake with split infinitive. From Old Norse aka, from Proto-Germanic *akaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵeti.

Verb edit

haka (past tense hok)

  1. (dialectal, Eastern Norway) alternative form of aka (to go; glide)
    • 1953, Reidar Holtvedt, Historier fra Krokskauen, Oslo: Aschehoug, page 196:
      Ja, guttungen hok der forrige daen, han, og je har nå høki der je au, sa han.
      Yeah. The kid went there the other day, he. And I have gone there as well, says he.

Etymology 5 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

haka n

  1. definite plural of hak

References edit

  • “haka” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “haka”, in Norsk Ordbok: ordbok over det norske folkemålet og det nynorske skriftmålet, Oslo: Samlaget, 1950-2016
  • “haka” in Ivar Aasen (1873) Norsk Ordbog med dansk Forklaring

Old Norse edit

Etymology edit

Related to the root of haki (hook, pick), from Proto-Germanic *hakô, referring to something pointing out.[1]

Noun edit

haka f (genitive hǫku, plural hǫkur)

  1. chin

Declension edit

Descendants edit

References edit

haka”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) “537-538”, in Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume 2, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, pages 537-538

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈxa.ka/
  • Rhymes: -aka
  • Syllabification: ha‧ka

Noun edit

haka m inan

  1. genitive/accusative singular of hak

Rapa Nui edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *faka-. Cognates include Hawaiian haʻa- and Maori whaka-.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈha.ka/
  • Hyphenation: ha‧ka

Particle edit

haka

  1. Used to indicate the causative aspect.

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Veronica Du Feu (1996) Rapanui (Descriptive Grammars), Routledge, →ISBN, page 153
  • Paulus Kieviet (2017) A grammar of Rapa Nui[6], Berlin: Language Science Press, →ISBN, page 441

Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse haka.

Noun edit

haka c

  1. chin, lower part of face
Declension edit
Declension of haka 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative haka hakan hakor hakorna
Genitive hakas hakans hakors hakornas

Etymology 2 edit

hake (hook) +‎ -a

Verb edit

haka (present hakar, preterite hakade, supine hakat, imperative haka)

  1. (often with fast, , or upp) to hook (attach with something hook-like)
  2. (often with i) to get hooked (stuck on something hook-like, not figuratively)
Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Tagalog edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hakà (Baybayin spelling ᜑᜃ)

  1. idea; opinion
    Synonyms: palagay, kuro, kuro-kuro, opinyon
  2. notion; understanding
    Synonyms: pagkaunawa, pagkaintindi, pagkahiwatig
  3. belief
    Synonyms: paniwala, paniniwala
  4. guess
    Synonym: hula
  5. suspicion
    Synonyms: hinala, paghihinala

Derived terms edit