crevasse

See also: crevice and crévasse

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From French crevasse. Doublet of crevice.

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -æs
  • IPA(key): /kɹəˈvæs/
  • (file)

NounEdit

crevasse (plural crevasses)

  1. A crack or fissure in a glacier or snowfield; a chasm.
  2. (US) A breach in a canal or river bank.
  3. (by extension) Any cleft or fissure.
    • 2010, Scott R. Riley, A Lost Hero Found (page 111)
      I moved my left hand to the small of her back, just above her belt-line and stroked the peach fuzz in her crevasse with my fingers.
  4. (figuratively) A discontinuity or “gap” between the accounted variables and an observed outcome.
    • 1954: Gilbert Ryle, Dilemmas: The Tarner Lectures, 1953, dilemma vii: Perception, page 105 (The Syndics of the Cambridge University Press)
      [] he laments that he can find no physiological phenomenon answering to his subject’s winning a race, or losing it. Between his terminal output of energy and his victory or defeat there is a mysterious crevasse. Physiology is baffled.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

crevasse (third-person singular simple present crevasses, present participle crevassing, simple past and past participle crevassed)

  1. (intransitive) To form crevasses.
  2. (transitive) To fissure with crevasses.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Old French crevace, crever +‎ -asse

NounEdit

crevasse f (plural crevasses)

  1. crevasse

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected forms

VerbEdit

crevasse

  1. first-person singular imperfect subjunctive of crever

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

crevasse f (plural crevasses)

  1. (glaciology) crevasse (a crack or fissure in a glacier or snow field)