Open main menu

EnglishEdit

 
A canal.
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French canal, from Old French canal, from Latin canālis (channel; canal), from canālis (canal), from canna (reed, cane), from Ancient Greek κάννα (kánna, reed), from Akkadian 𒄀 (qanû, reed), from Sumerian 𒄀𒈾 (gi.na). Doublet of channel.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /kəˈnæl/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /kəˈnɛl/
  • Rhymes: -æl

NounEdit

canal (plural canals)

  1. An artificial waterway or artificially improved river used for travel, shipping, or irrigation.
  2. (anatomy) A tubular channel within the body.
  3. (astronomy) One of the faint, hazy markings resembling straight lines on early telescopic images of the surface of Mars.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Scottish Gaelic: canàl

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

canal (third-person singular simple present canals, present participle canaling or canalling, simple past and past participle canaled or canalled)

  1. To dig an artificial waterway in or to (a place), especially for drainage
    • 1968, Louisiana State University, Proceedings[1], page 165:
      In the mangrove-type salt marsh, the entire marsh must be canaled or impounded.
  2. To travel along a canal by boat
    • 1905, William Yoast Morgan, A Journey of a Jayhawker, page 211:
      Near Rotterdam we canalled by Delfthaven.

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin canālis.

NounEdit

canal f (plural canales)

  1. canal (artificial waterway)

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin canālis (channel; canal).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canal m (plural canals)

  1. canal; channel (artificial passage for water)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin canālis. Doublet of chenal.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canal m (plural canaux)

  1. canal
  2. channel (broadcasting: specific radio frequency or band of frequencies)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese canal (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria): cana (cane, reed) +‎ -al. Cognate with Spanish cañal.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canal m (plural canais)

  1. (dated) fish-weir; place or installation for fishing, on a river
    • 1375, A. López Ferreiro (ed.), Galicia Histórica. Colección diplomática. Santiago: Tipografía Galaica, page 385:
      V casares en Cesar os quaes fforon de Mayor Aras moller de Martin Sanchez Xarpa com huum paaço et con huum canal enno Tamare.
      5 farmhouses in Cesar, which belonged to Maior Aras, wife of Martín Sánchez Xarpa, with a manor and a fishery on the river Tambre
    Synonyms: caneiro, pesqueira

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowing from Latin canalis. Doublet of canle and cal.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canal m (plural canais)

  1. canal
  2. channel

ReferencesEdit

  • canal” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • canal” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • canar” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • canal” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • canal” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • canal” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.



NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French canal, from Latin canālis (channel; canal).

NounEdit

canal m (plural canaux)

  1. (Jersey) canal

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
 
canal

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese canal, from Latin canālis (canal), from canna (reed, cane), from Ancient Greek κάννα (kánna, reed), from Akkadian 𒄀 (qanû, reed), from Sumerian 𒄀𒈾 (gi.na). This form may possibly be an early borrowing or semi-learned term; cf. the fully inherited doublet cale, and related calha.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canal m (plural canais)

  1. ditch
  2. canal (artificial waterway)
  3. (radio) channel (broadcasting: specific radio frequency or band of frequencies)
  4. (television) television channel

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French canal, Latin canālis.

NounEdit

canal n (plural canale)

  1. (plural canaluri) canal
  2. channel

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish canal, from Latin canālis (channel; canal).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canal m (plural canales)

  1. canal (waterway)
  2. channel (of television)
  3. (communication) channel
  4. (chemistry) channel
  5. cleavage

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin canālis.

NounEdit

canal m (plural canałi)

  1. canal
  2. channel (all senses)