See also: Crocus

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
Crocus sativus

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin crocus, from Ancient Greek κρόκος (krókos, crocus).

NounEdit

crocus (plural crocuses or croci or crocus)

  1. A perennial flowering plant (of the genus Crocus in the Iridaceae family). Saffron is obtained from the stamens of Crocus sativus.
    • 1981, William Irwin Thompson, The Time Falling Bodies Take to Light: Mythology, Sexuality and the Origins of Culture, London: Rider/Hutchinson & Co., page 128:
      Nothing is more short-lived than the erection; like the crocus of spring, it is there for a moment, and then it is gone; one moment the penis is small, soft, and insignificant, and then in the next it is hard, rigid, and three and four times its previous size.
  2. Any of various similar flowering plants, such as the autumn crocus and prairie crocus.
  3. (chemistry, obsolete) A deep yellow powder, the oxide of some metal (especially iron), calcined to a red or deep yellow colour.
  4. (obsolete, slang) A fraudulent doctor; a quack.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “From croker?”)

NounEdit

crocus (uncountable)

  1. (Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago) Burlap.
    a crocus bag

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin crocus, from Ancient Greek κρόκος (krókos, crocus).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crocus m (plural crocus)

  1. crocus

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin crocus, from Ancient Greek κρόκος (krókos, crocus).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crocus m (plural crocus)

  1. crocus (plant)

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

 
crocus (crocus plant)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κρόκος (krókos, crocus).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crocus m (genitive crocī); second declension

  1. crocus, saffron

Usage notesEdit

Most often, the masculine crocus was used to refer to the plant, while the neuter crocum was used for saffron gathered from the plant. However, this distinction is not universally observed, and the word crocus may refer either to the crocus plant or to saffron taken from the plant.

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative crocus crocī
Genitive crocī crocōrum
Dative crocō crocīs
Accusative crocum crocōs
Ablative crocō crocīs
Vocative croce crocī

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • crocus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • crocus”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • crocus”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray