See also: Cyme

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from French cime, cyme (top, summit), from Vulgar Latin *cima, from Latin cȳma (young sprout of a cabbage”, “spring shoots of cabbage), from Ancient Greek κῦμα (kûma, anything swollen, such as a wave or billow”; “fetus”, “embryo”, “sprout of a plant), from κύω (kúō, I conceive”, “I become pregnant”; in the aorist “I impregnate). For considerably more information, see cyma, which is an etymological doublet.

Alternative forms edit

  • cime (in the obsolete first sense only, [18th century])

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cyme (plural cymes)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A “head” (of unexpanded leaves, etc.); an opening bud.
  2. (botany) A flattish or convex flower cluster, of the centrifugal or determinate type, on which each axis terminates with a flower which blooms before the flowers below it. Contrast raceme.
    • 1906, “Gentianaceæ”, in Daniel Coit Gilman, Harry Thurston Peck, Frank Moore Colby, editors, The New International Encyclopædia:
      The inflorescence is some form of cyme, and the flowers are usually regular.
    • 2003, S. M. Reddy, S. J. Chary, University Botany 2: Gymnosperms, Plant Anatomy, Genetics, Ecology, page 190:
      The plant bears small groups of two or three yellowish coloured flowers on an axillary cyme.
    • 2003, David Curtis Ferree, Ian J. Warrington, Apples: Botany, Production and Uses, page 157:
      The flower cluster is a cyme (terminal flower is the most advanced), is terminal within the bud and may contain up to six individual flowers.
  3. (architecture) = cyma
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Translations edit

References edit

  • Cyme” listed on page 1303 of volume II (C) of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles [1st ed., 1893]
      Cyme (səim). Also 8 cime. [a. F. cime, cyme, in the sense ‘top, summit’ (12th c. in Hatzf.): — pop. L. cima = L. cyma (see above); in the Bot. sense an 18th c. adaptation of the ancient L.] [¶] † 1. (cime.) A ‘head’ (of unexpanded leaves, etc.). Obs. rare. [¶] 1725 Bradley Fam. Dict. s. v. Sallet, The Buds and tender Cime of Nettles by some eaten raw, by others boiled. [¶] 2.Bot. (cyme.) A species of inflorescence wherein the primary axis bears a single terminal flower which develops first, the system being continued by axes of secondary and higher orders which develop successively in like manner; a centrifugal or definite inflorescence: opposed to Raceme. Applied esp. to compound inflorescences of this type forming a more or less flat head. [¶] 1794 Martyn Rousseau’s Bot. v. 55 The arrangement of the flowers in the elder is called a cyme. 1854 S. Thomson Wild Fl. iii. (ed. 4) 250 The meadow-sweet, with its crowded cymes. [¶] 3.Arch. = Cyma. [¶] 1877 Blackmore Erema III. xlvii. 106 This is what we call a cyme-joint, a cohesion of two curved surfaces.
  • cyme”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.
  • cyme” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd ed., 1989]

Etymology 2 edit

An error for cynne, probably resulting from the overlapping of the two ens in handwriting.

Noun edit

cyme (plural cymes)

  1. Misspelling of senna.

References edit

  • Cyme” listed on page 1303 of volume II (C) of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles [1st ed., 1893]
      Cyme (Shaks. Macb. v. iii. 55, 1st Folio), supposed to be an error for cynne, Senna. [¶] 1605 Shaks. Macb. v. iii. 55 What Rubarb, Cyme, or what Purgatiue drugge Would scowre these English hence.
  • cyme” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd ed., 1989]

French edit

Noun edit

cyme f (plural cymes)

  1. (botany) cyme

Further reading edit

Old English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Germanic *kumiz (arrival), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷem- (to go, come). Akin to Old Frisian keme, Old Saxon kumi, Old High German cumi (arrival), Gothic 𐌵𐌿𐌼𐍃 (qums), Old English cuman (to come). More at come.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cyme m

  1. coming, arrival; advent, approach
    • late 9th century, translation of Bede's Ecclesiastical History
      ...ymb fēower ⁊ fēowertiġ wintra Ongolcynnes cȳmes in Breotone
      ...about forty-four years after the arrival of the Angles in Britain.
  2. an event
  3. an outcome, result
Declension edit
Descendants edit
  • Middle English: come, cume, coom, coome; kime, keome
    • English: come (obsolete)
    • Scots: come

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Germanic *kūmiz (delicate, feeble). Akin to Old High German kūmo (tender, dainty, weak) (German kaum (hardly)), (Dutch kuim (weak; hardly)) .

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

cȳme

  1. comely, lovely, splendid, beautiful
  2. exquisite
Declension edit
Related terms edit