See also: lath

EnglishEdit

 
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A lathe

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) enPR: th IPA(key): /leɪð/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪð

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lathen, from Old English laþian (to invite, summon, call upon, ask), from Proto-Germanic *laþōną (to invite), from Proto-Indo-European *lēy- (to want, desire). Cognate with German laden (to invite), Icelandic laða (to attract).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

lathe (third-person singular simple present lathes, present participle lathing, simple past and past participle lathed)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To invite; bid; ask.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English *lath, from Old English lǣþ (a division of a county containing several hundreds, a district, lathe).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lathe (plural lathes)

  1. (obsolete) An administrative division of the county of Kent, in England, from the Anglo-Saxon period until it fell entirely out of use in the early twentieth century.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English lath (turning-lathe; stand), from Old Norse hlað (pile, heap)—compare dialectal Danish lad (stand, support frame) (as in drejelad (turning-lathe), savelad (saw bench)), dialectal Norwegian la, lad (pile, small wall), dialectal Swedish lad (folding table, lay of a loom)—from hlaða (to load). More at lade.

NounEdit

lathe (plural lathes)

  1. A machine tool used to shape a piece of material, or workpiece, by rotating the workpiece against a cutting tool.
    He shaped the bedpost by turning it on a lathe.
    • 1856: Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part II Chapter IV, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
      Of the windows of the village there was one yet more often occupied; for on Sundays from morning to night, and every morning when the weather was bright, one could see at the dormer-window of the garret the profile of Monsieur Binet bending over his lathe, whose monotonous humming could be heard at the Lion d'Or.
  2. The movable swing frame of a loom, carrying the reed for separating the warp threads and beating up the weft; a lay, or batten.
  3. (obsolete) A granary; a barn.
    • 2008 [1894], Walter William Skeat, Notes on The Canterbury Tales. Complete Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, Vol. 5, page 124:
      [] lathe, a barn, is still used in some parts of Yorkshire, but chiefly in local designations, being otherwise obsolescent ; see the Cleveland and Whitby glossaries. ‘The northern man writing to his neighbor may say, “My lathe standeth neer the kirkegarth,” for My barn standeth neere the churchyard’
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

lathe (third-person singular simple present lathes, present participle lathing, simple past and past participle lathed)

  1. To shape with a lathe.
  2. (computer graphics) To produce a three-dimensional model by rotating a set of points around a fixed axis.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hlað (pile, heap). More at English, Etymology 3, above.

NounEdit

lathe (plural lathes)

  1. a barn to house livestock or store grain, etc.; a storehouse
    • c. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Reeve’s Tale”, in The Canterbury Tales:
      By Goddes herte, he sal nat scape us bathe!
      Why ne had thow pit the capul in the lathe!
      By God’s heart, he will not escape us both! Why didn’t you put the horse in the barn!