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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

1590s, from Middle French desbander (Modern French débander), from des- (English dis-) + bande (English band),[1] ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie). Surface analysis dis- +‎ band.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

disband (third-person singular simple present disbands, present participle disbanding, simple past and past participle disbanded)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To break up or (cause to) cease to exist; to disperse.
    The president wanted to disband the scandal-plagued agency.
    I used to be in a punk band, but we disbanded in the early 1980s.
    • Knolles
      They disbanded themselves and returned, every man to his own dwelling.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To loose the bands of; to set free.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To divorce.
    • Milton
      And therefore [] she ought to be disbanded.

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TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ disband” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

AnagramsEdit