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EtymologyEdit

From Old French divorce, from Latin dīvortium, from dīvertere (to turn aside), from dī- (apart) + vertere (to turn); see verse.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

divorce (countable and uncountable, plural divorces)

  1. The legal dissolution of a marriage.
    Richard obtained a divorce from his wife some years ago, but hasn't returned to the dating scene.
  2. A separation of connected things.
    The Civil War split between Virginia and West Virginia was a divorce based along cultural and economic as well as geographic lines.
  3. (obsolete) That which separates.
    • c. 1613, Shakespeare, William; Fletcher, John, Henry VIII, Act 2, Scene 1:
      Go with me like good angels to my end; / And as the long divorce of steel falls on me, / Make of your prayers one sweet sacrifice, / And lift my soul to heaven. Lead on, o' God's name.

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VerbEdit

divorce (third-person singular simple present divorces, present participle divorcing, simple past and past participle divorced)

  1. (transitive) To legally dissolve a marriage between two people.
    A ship captain can marry couples, but cannot divorce them.
  2. (transitive) To end one's own marriage to (a person) in this way.
    Lucy divorced Steve when she discovered that he had been unfaithful.
  3. (intransitive) To obtain a legal divorce.
    Edna and Simon divorced last year; he got the house, and she retained the business.
  4. (transitive) To separate something that was connected.
    The radical group voted to divorce itself from the main faction and start an independent movement.
    • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Night, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iv], page 269:
      He is knight dubb'd with vnhatche'd Rapier, and on carpet conſideration, but he is a diuell in priuate brall, soules and bodies hath he diuorc'd three, and his incenſement at this moment is ſo implacable, that ſatisfaction can be none, but by pangs of death and ſepulcher: Hob, nob, is his word: giu't or take't.

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit