English edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
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Borrowing from Burmese နတ် (nat).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nat (plural nats)

  1. A spirit in Burmese mythology, whose cult is followed alongside Buddhism.
    • 1936, Rollo Ahmed, The Black Art, London: Long, page 175:
      They greatly dread evil "Nats" or spirits, to whom they attribute every possible misfortune or illness.

Etymology 2 edit

Reduced form of naught.

Adverb edit

nat (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Not. [14th–17th c.]
    • 1614, William Browne, The Shepheard's Pipe:
      And he a pistle rowned in her eare, / Nat what I want, for I ne came nat there.

Etymology 3 edit

Abbreviation of natural logarithm.

Noun edit

nat (plural nats)

  1. A logarithmic unit of information or entropy, based on natural logarithms.
Synonyms edit
See also edit

Etymology 4 edit

Noun edit

nat (plural nats)

  1. (colloquial, US) Clipping of natatorium.

Anagrams edit

Aromanian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin nātus (born). Compare Romanian nat (personal, individual).

Noun edit

nat m

  1. child

Related terms edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Catalan nat, from Latin nātus, from earlier gnātus, from Proto-Italic *gnātos, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵn̥h₁tós (begotten, produced), derived from the root *ǵenh₁- (to beget, give birth).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

nat (feminine nada, masculine plural nats, feminine plural nades)

  1. born
    Synonym: nascut

Derived terms edit

References edit

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Danish nat, from Old Norse nátt, nótt, from Proto-Germanic *nahts, from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nat c (singular definite natten, plural indefinite nætter)

  1. night (period between sunset and sunrise)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch nat, from Old Dutch nat, from Proto-West Germanic *nat, from Proto-Germanic *nataz.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /nɑt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: nat
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Adjective edit

nat (comparative natter, superlative natst)

  1. wet
    Na de regen was het gras nat en modderig.
    After the rain, the grass was wet and muddy.
    Trek een jas aan, anders word je nat in de regen.
    Put on a coat, or you'll get wet in the rain.
    De hond kwam terug van zijn wandeling met natte poten.
    The dog came back from his walk with wet paws.
    We moesten schuilen voor de natte sneeuw.
    We had to take shelter from the wet snow.
    De kinderen kwamen binnen met natte kleren na het spelen in de regen.
    The children came inside with wet clothes after playing in the rain.

Inflection edit

Declension of nat
uninflected nat
inflected natte
comparative natter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial nat natter het natst
het natste
indefinite m./f. sing. natte nattere natste
n. sing. nat natter natste
plural natte nattere natste
definite natte nattere natste
partitive nats natters

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Berbice Creole Dutch: nati
  • Negerhollands: nat
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: nat
  • Aukan: nati

Noun edit

nat n (uncountable)

  1. moisture

Derived terms edit

Jingpho edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

nat

  1. to burn

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *na-(n/t) (ill; evil spirit).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nat

  1. ghost; god; spirit

References edit

  • Xu, Xijian (徐悉艰), Xiao, Jiacheng (肖家成), Yue, Xiangkun (岳相昆), Dai, Qingxia (戴庆厦) (1983 December) “nat”, in 景汉辞典 [Jingpho-Chinese Dictionary], Kunming: Yunnan Nationalities Publishing House, page 557

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

nat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of

Maia edit

Noun edit

nat

  1. rain

Middle English edit

Adverb edit

nat

  1. Alternative form of not
    • 13??, Geoffrey Chaucer, Boethius and Troilus
      And at the laste, yif that any wight wene a thing to ben other weyes thanne it is, it is nat only unscience, but it is deceivable opinioun ful diverse and fer fro the sothe of science.

Noun edit

nat

  1. Alternative form of not

Old English edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

nāt

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of nytan

Old Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse nátt, from Proto-Germanic *nahts.

Noun edit

nāt f

  1. night

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin nātus, from earlier gnātus, from Proto-Italic *gnātos, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵn̥h₁tós (begotten, produced), derived from the root *ǵenh₁- (to beget, give birth). The meaning in Romanian developed from that of "offspring" or "progeny" in relation to the parent. Compare Aromanian nat (child), also Occitan nada (girl).

Noun edit

nat m (plural nați)

  1. (uncommon, popular) person, individual
    Synonyms: om, persoană, individ, ins
  2. (uncommon, popular) kinsman, relative
    Synonyms: rudă, rudenie

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Singpho edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *na-(n/t).

Noun edit

nat

  1. spirit

References edit

Tzotzil edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

nat

  1. deep
    ti nat uk'umethe deep stream

Related terms edit

(Verbs)

(Adjectives)

(Adjectives & Nouns)

References edit

Yola edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English nat.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

nat

  1. not
    • 1867, “ABOUT AN OLD SOW GOING TO BE KILLED”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 2, page 106:
      Gooude var nat oan dhing, niether treesh ar thraame;
      Good for not one thing; neither for the trace, nor the car.

Derived terms edit

  • nad (had not)

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 58