See also: Nat, NAT, nät, nǟt, Nät, nåt, and Nat.

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Borrowing from Burmese နတ်(nat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nat ‎(plural nats)

  1. A spirit in Burmese mythology, whose cult is followed alongside Buddhism.

Etymology 2Edit

Reduced form of naught.

AdverbEdit

nat ‎(not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Not. [14th-17th c.]
    • 1614, William Browne, The Shepheard's Pipe:
      And he a pistle rowned in her eare, / Nat what I want, for I ne came nat there.

Etymology 3Edit

Abbreviation of natural logarithm.

NounEdit

nat ‎(plural nats)

  1. logarithmic unit of information or entropy, based on natural logarithms
SynonymsEdit
See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nātus.

AdjectiveEdit

nat m ‎(feminine nada, masculine plural nats, feminine plural nades)

  1. born

SynonymsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Danish nat, from Old Norse nátt, nótt, from Proto-Germanic *nahts, from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nat c (singular definite natten, plural indefinite nætter)

  1. night (period between sunset and sunrise)

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch nat, from Old Dutch nat, from Proto-Germanic *nataz.

AdjectiveEdit

nat ‎(comparative natter, superlative natst)

  1. wet

InflectionEdit

Inflection of nat
uninflected nat
inflected natte
comparative natter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial nat natter het natst
het natste
indefinite m./f. sing. natte nattere natste
n. sing. nat natter natste
plural natte nattere natste
definite natte nattere natste
partitive nats natters

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

nat n ‎(uncountable)

  1. moisture

LatinEdit

LojbanEdit

PronunciationEdit

RafsiEdit

nat (or alternate rafsi nai )

  1. rafsi of natmi(nation).

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old English *nōht, nāht(nought, nothing), short for nōwiht, nāwiht(nothing, literally no thing, no creature), corresponding to (no) + wiht(thing, creature).

AdverbEdit

nat

  1. not
    • 13??, Geoffrey Chaucer, Boethius and Troilus
      And at the laste, yif that any wight wene a thing to ben other weyes thanne it is, it is nat only unscience, but it is deceivable opinioun ful diverse and fer fro the sothe of science.

Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse nátt, from Proto-Germanic *nahts.

NounEdit

nāt f

  1. night

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nātus, taking the meaning of "offspring" or "progeny" in relation to the parent. Compare Aromanian nat(child), also Provençal nada ("girl").

NounEdit

nat m ‎(plural nați)

  1. (uncommon, popular) person, individual
  2. (uncommon, popular) kinsman, relative

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


TzotzilEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nat

  1. deep
    ti nat uk'ume - the deep stream

Related termsEdit

(Verbs)

(Adjectives)

(Adjectives & Nouns)

ReferencesEdit