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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

First attested from 1603, from Middle French enthousiasme, from Late Latin enthusiasmus, from Ancient Greek ἐνθουσιασμός (enthousiasmós), from ἔνθεος (éntheos, possessed by god's) ουσία (ousía, essence), from ἐν (en, in) + θεός (theós, god) + ουσία (ousía, essence).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈθjuːzɪæz(ə)m/, /ɛn-/
  • (yod dropping) IPA(key): /-θuː-/
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NounEdit

enthusiasm (countable and uncountable, plural enthusiasms)

  1. (obsolete or historical) Possession by a god; divine inspiration or frenzy.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, ch. 1
      The intoxication that they sought was that of ‘enthusiasm’, of union with the god.
  2. Intensity of feeling; excited interest or eagerness.
  3. Something in which one is keenly interested.
    • 1968, Central States Archaeological Journal (volumes 15-16, page 154)
      My main enthusiasm is attending and seeing the progress and interest of collectors, to meet old friends, and hopefully to make new friends.
    • 2012, Nicholas Joll, Philosophy and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (page 23)
      Other Adamsian enthusiasms included: fast cars; restaurants; Bach, the Beatles, Pink Floyd and Dire Straits; []

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