envelop

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English envolupen, from Old French anveloper, envoluper (modern French envelopper), from en- + voloper, vloper (to wrap, wrap up) (compare Italian -viluppare; Old Italian alternate form goluppare (to wrap)) from Vulgar Latin *vuloppare (to wrap), from Proto-Germanic *wlappaną, *wrappaną (to wrap, roll up, turn, wind), from Proto-Indo-European *werb- (to turn, bend) [1]. Akin to Middle English wlappen (to wrap, fold) (Modern English lap (to wrap, involve, fold)), Middle English wrappen (to wrap), Middle Dutch lappen (to wrap up, embrace), Danish dialectal vravle (to wind, twist), Middle Low German wrempen (to wrinkle, distort), Old English wearp (warp). Doublet of enwrap.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ĕn-vĕlʹəp, IPA(key): /ɛnˈvɛləp/
  • (file)
  • (file)

VerbEdit

envelop (third-person singular simple present envelops, present participle enveloping, simple past and past participle enveloped)

  1. (transitive) To surround or enclose.
    • 1906 April, O. Henry [pseudonym; William Sydney Porter], “From the Cabby’s Seat”, in The Four Million, New York, N.Y.: McClure, Phillips & Co, OCLC 1399985, page 165:
      In the fulness of time there was an eruption of the merry-makers to the sidewalk. The uninvited guests enveloped and permeated them, and upon the night air rose joyous cries, congratulations, laughter and unclassified noises born of McGary's oblations to the hymeneal scene.
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page 4:
      (b) sporophyte with foot reduced, the entire sporophyte enveloped by the calyptra, which is ± stipitate at the base.
    • 2011 December 10, Marc Higginson, “Bolton 1 - 2 Aston Villa”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      The Midlanders will hope the victory will kickstart a campaign that looked to have hit the buffers, but the sense of trepidation enveloping the Reebok Stadium heading into the new year underlines the seriousness of the predicament facing Owen Coyle's men.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French enveloppe.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɑn.vəˈlɔp/, /ˌɛn.vəˈlɔp/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: en‧ve‧lop
  • Rhymes: -ɔp

NounEdit

envelop f (plural enveloppen, diminutive envelopje n)

  1. An envelope, closing paper wrapper as used for mailing

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Indonesian: amplop

AnagramsEdit