explicit

See also: explícit

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested 1609, from French explicite, from Latin explicitus (disentangled", "easy), an alternative form of the past participle of explicāre (to unfold), from ex- (out) + plicō (to fold). Pornographic sense is from 1971.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈsplɪsɪt/ enPR: ĭk-splĭsʹĭt
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪsɪt

AdjectiveEdit

explicit (comparative more explicit, superlative most explicit)

  1. Very specific, clear, or detailed.
    I gave explicit instructions for him to stay here, but he followed me, anyway.
  2. (euphemistic) Containing material (e.g. language or film footage) that might be deemed offensive or graphic.
    The film had several scenes including explicit language and sex.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

PhraseEdit

explicit

  1. (obsolete) Used at the conclusion of a book to indicate the end.

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin explicit (to unfold).

NounEdit

explicit m (plural explicits)

  1. end (of a story)

AntonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin explicit.

NounEdit

explicit m (oblique plural expliciz or explicitz, nominative singular expliciz or explicitz, nominative plural explicit)

  1. end (of a story)

SynonymsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French explicite, from Latin explicitus.

AdjectiveEdit

explicit m or n (feminine singular explicită, masculine plural expliciți, feminine and neuter plural explicite)

  1. explicit

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

explicit

  1. explicit

AdverbEdit

explicit

  1. explicitly