proprio

See also: próprio

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of propriétaire + -o.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proprio m (plural proprios, feminine propriote)

  1. (colloquial) landlord
  2. (colloquial) householder, landowner (real estate proprietor)

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin proprius.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈprɔ.prjo/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔprjo
  • Hyphenation: prò‧prio

AdjectiveEdit

proprio (feminine propria, masculine plural propri, feminine plural proprie)

  1. (possessive) one's, one's own, her (own), its (own), their (own)
    pensare ai fatti proprito mind one's own business
    fare del proprio meglioto do one's best
    in proprioon one's own, by oneself
  2. (possessive, peculiar) characteristic, peculiar, typical
    il cimurro è una malattia propria del canedistemper is a disease peculiar to the dog
  3. (possessive, grammar, mathematics) proper
    nome proprioproper noun

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

proprio

  1. (really) really, quite, indeed
    Anna è proprio bella.Anna is really beautiful.
  2. (exactly) just, quite, exactly
    proprio allorajust then
  3. (intensifier) very, right, at all
    proprio orathis very minute

DescendantsEdit

  • Slavomolisano: proprja

NounEdit

proprio m (plural propri)

  1. one's own, what belongs to one, one's due
    a ciascuno il proprioto each his due

PronounEdit

proprio m (feminine singular propria, masculine plural propri, feminine plural proprie)

  1. (possessive) one's, one's own, her (own), its (own), their (own)

ReferencesEdit

  • proprio in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From proprius +‎ .

VerbEdit

propriō (present infinitive propriāre, perfect active propriāvī); first conjugation, no passive, no supine stem

  1. I appropriate.
ConjugationEdit
   Conjugation of propriō (first conjugation, active only)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present propriō propriās propriat propriāmus propriātis propriant
imperfect propriābam propriābās propriābat propriābāmus propriābātis propriābant
future propriābō propriābis propriābit propriābimus propriābitis propriābunt
perfect propriāvī propriāvistī propriāvit propriāvimus propriāvistis propriāvērunt,
propriāvēre
pluperfect propriāveram propriāverās propriāverat propriāverāmus propriāverātis propriāverant
future perfect propriāverō propriāveris propriāverit propriāverimus propriāveritis propriāverint
sigmatic future1 propriāssō propriāssis propriāssit propriāssimus propriāssitis propriāssint
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present propriem propriēs propriet propriēmus propriētis proprient
imperfect propriārem propriārēs propriāret propriārēmus propriārētis propriārent
perfect propriāverim propriāverīs propriāverit propriāverīmus propriāverītis propriāverint
pluperfect propriāvissem propriāvissēs propriāvisset propriāvissēmus propriāvissētis propriāvissent
sigmatic aorist1 propriāssim propriāssīs propriāssīt propriāssīmus propriāssītis propriāssint
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present propriā propriāte
future propriātō propriātō propriātōte propriantō
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives propriāre propriāvisse propriātūrum esse
participles propriāns propriātūrus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
propriandī propriandō propriandum propriandō propriātum propriātū

1At least one use of the archaic "sigmatic future" and "sigmatic aorist" tenses is attested, which are used by Old Latin writers; most notably Plautus and Terence. The sigmatic future is generally ascribed a future or future perfect meaning, while the sigmatic aorist expresses a possible desire ("might want to").

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

AdjectiveEdit

propriō

  1. dative/ablative masculine/neuter singular of proprius

ReferencesEdit

  • proprio”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • proprio in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

proprio m (feminine singular propria, masculine plural proprios, feminine plural proprias, not comparable)

  1. Obsolete spelling of próprio

SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

proprio (feminine propria, masculine plural proprios, feminine plural proprias)

  1. Obsolete spelling of propio

Further readingEdit