See also: vagué

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French vague, from Latin vagus (uncertain, vague, literally wandering, rambling, strolling).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /veɪɡ/
  • IPA(key): (Upper Midwest US) /væɡ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪɡ, -æɡ

AdjectiveEdit

vague (comparative vaguer, superlative vaguest)

  1. Not clearly expressed; stated in indefinite terms.
    • 1921, Bertrand Russell, The Analysis of Mind:
      It follows from what has been said that a vague thought has more likelihood of being true than a precise one. To try and hit an object with a vague thought is like trying to hit the bull's eye with a lump of putty: when the putty reaches the target, it flattens out all over it, and probably covers the bull's eye along with the rest. To try and hit an object with a precise thought is like trying to hit the bull's eye with a bullet. The advantage of the precise thought is that it distinguishes between the bull's eye and the rest of the target.
    • 2004: Chris Wallace, Character: Profiles in Presidential Courage
      Throughout the first week of his presidency, Dulles and Bissell continued to brief Kennedy on their strategy for Cuba, but the men were vague and their meetings offered little in the way of hard facts.
    inarticulate, Synonym: unclear; see also Thesaurus:incomprehensible
  2. Not having a precise meaning.
    a vague term of abuse
    Synonyms: ambiguous, equivocal
  3. Not clearly defined, grasped, or understood; indistinct; slight.
    only a vague notion of what’s needed
    a vague hint of a thickening waistline
    I haven’t the vaguest idea.
    Synonyms: ambiguous, equivocal, indistinct, obscure; see also Thesaurus:vague
  4. Not clearly felt or sensed; somewhat subconscious.
    a vague longing
  5. Not thinking or expressing one’s thoughts clearly or precisely.
    • 1962, Philip Larkin, "Toads Revisited"
      Waxed-fleshed out-patients / Still vague from accidents, / And characters in long coats / Deep in the litter-baskets []
    Synonym: dazed
  6. Lacking expression; vacant.
    Synonyms: vacant, vacuous
  7. Not sharply outlined; hazy.
    • 1922, Michael Arlen, “Ep./1/2”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days:
      He walked. To the corner of Hamilton Place and Picadilly, and there stayed for a while, for it is a romantic station by night. The vague and careless rain looked like threads of gossamer silver passing across the light of the arc-lamps.
    Synonyms: fuzzy, hazy, ill-defined; see also Thesaurus:indistinct
  8. Wandering; vagrant; vagabond.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Hayward and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      to set upon the vague villains
    • 1819, John Keats, “The Eve of St. Agnes”, in Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems, London: Printed [by Thomas Davison] for Taylor and Hessey, [], published 1820, OCLC 927360557, stanza VIII, page 87:
      She danced along with vague, regardless eyes, / Anxious her lips, her breathing quick and short: [...]
    Synonyms: erratic, roaming, unsettled, vagrant, vagabond

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

vague (plural vagues)

  1. (obsolete) A wandering; a vagary.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holinshed to this entry?)
  2. An indefinite expanse.
    • (Can we date this quote by Lowell and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      The gray vague of unsympathizing sea.

VerbEdit

vague (third-person singular simple present vagues, present participle vaguing, simple past and past participle vagued)

  1. (archaic) to wander; to roam; to stray.
    • (Can we date this quote by Holland and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      [The soul] doth vague and wander.
  2. To become vague or act in a vague manner.
    • 1894, Mrs. Campbell Praed, Christina Chard, page 52:
      Vaguely, yes. I've vagued all my life; that's been my curse.
    • 1939, John Steinbeck, East of Eden:
      A man's mind vagued up a little, for how can you remember the feel of pleasure or pain or choking emotion?
    • 2009, Zoe Foster Blake, Air Kisses, →ISBN:
      What's with you? You're all vagued out.

Further readingEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vagus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vague (feminine vaga, masculine and feminine plural vagues)

  1. vague

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French [Term?], from Old French vague (movement on the surface of a liquid, ripple), from Old Norse vágr (sea), from Proto-Germanic *wēgaz (wave, storm), from Proto-Indo-European *weǵhe- (to drag, carry). Cognate with Swedish våg (wave), Middle Dutch waeghe, wage (wave), Old High German wāge (wave), Old English wǣg (wave, billow, motion, flood). More at waw, wave.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vague f (plural vagues)

  1. wave
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French vague, from Latin vagus (uncertain, vague, literally wandering, rambling, strolling).

AdjectiveEdit

vague (plural vagues)

  1. vague

NounEdit

vague m (plural vagues)

  1. vagueness
    Synonym: distrait
Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

vague

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of vagar

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

vague

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of vagar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of vagar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of vagar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of vagar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaɡe/, [ˈbaɣe]

VerbEdit

vague

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of vagar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of vagar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of vagar.