Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fac simile(make like), from fac(make), imperative of facere(make), + simile, neuter of similis(like, similar).

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs audio files. If you have a microphone, please record some and upload them. (For audio required quickly, visit WT:APR.)

NounEdit

facsimile ‎(plural facsimiles or facsimilia)

  1. A copy or reproduction.
    • 1964, Arthur Danto, “The Artworld” in Twentieth Century Theories of Art (1990), ed. James Matheson Thompson, § VIII, 540:
      To paraphrase the critic of the Times, if one may make the facsimile of a human being out of bronze, why not the facsimile of a Brillo carton out of plywood?
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:facsimile.
  2. A fax, a machine for making and sending copies of printed material and images via radio or telephone network.
  3. The image sent by the machine itself.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

facsimile ‎(third-person singular simple present facsimiles, present participle facsimileing or facsimiling, simple past and past participle facsimiled)

  1. (transitive) To send via a facsimile machine; to fax.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit