Last modified on 14 January 2015, at 11:21

fango

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Italian fango, perhaps from Catalan fang, or perhaps from a Germanic language.[1]

NounEdit

fango (uncountable)

  1. Mud from the thermal springs at Battaglia in Italy, used to treat certain medical complaints such as gout and rheumatism.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ fango” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Italian and Spanish fango (contrast Esperanto koto).

NounEdit

fango (plural fangi)

  1. mud, mire

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of Germanic origin, from Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌽𐌲𐌰 (fanga, mud, addle, mire), from Proto-Germanic *fangō (wetness, moisture), from Proto-Indo-European *pAnk- (mud, rot, filth). Cognate with French fange (mud, mire) (from Germanic), German feucht (moist, damp), Dutch vocht (moisture, humidity), Old English fūht (moist, damp), Swedish fukt (moisture, humidity).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fango m (plural fanghi)

  1. mud

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Catalan fang.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fango m (plural fangos)

  1. mud (soil and water)

SynonymsEdit