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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mire, a borrowing from Old Norse mýrr, from Proto-Germanic *miuzijō, whence also Swedish myr, Norwegian myr, Icelandic mýri, Dutch *mier (in placenames, for example Mierlo). Related to Proto-Germanic *meusą, whence Old English mēos, and Proto-Germanic *musą, whence Old English mos (English moss).

NounEdit

mire (countable and uncountable, plural mires)

  1. Deep mud; moist, spongy earth.
    • When Caliban was lazy and neglected his work, Ariel (who was invisible to all eyes but Prospero’s) would come slyly and pinch him, and sometimes tumble him down in the mire. (Charles Lamb, Tales from Shakespeare, Hatier, coll. « Les Classiques pour tous » n° 223, p. 51)
    Synonyms: peatland, quag
    Hypernym: wetland
    Hyponyms: bog, fen
  2. An undesirable situation, a predicament.
    • 2017 April 2, Dafydd Pritchard, “Swansea City 0-0 Middlesbrough”, in BBC Sport[1], London:
      Swansea seemed to be pulling clear of trouble with five wins in their first eight games following head coach Paul Clement's appointment, but two successive defeats had dragged the Swans back into the mire.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mire (third-person singular simple present mires, present participle miring, simple past and past participle mired)

  1. (transitive) To cause or permit to become stuck in mud; to plunge or fix in mud.
    to mire a horse or wagon
    Synonyms: bemire, enmire
  2. (intransitive) To sink into mud.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To weigh down.
  4. (intransitive) To soil with mud or foul matter.
    • c. 1598, William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing, Act IV, Scene 1,[2]
      Why had I not with charitable hand
      Took up a beggar’s issue at my gates,
      Who smirch’d thus and mired with infamy,
      I might have said ‘No part of it is mine;
      This shame derives itself from unknown loins’?
    Synonym: bemire

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English mire, from Old English *mȳre, *mīere, from Proto-Germanic *miurijǭ. Cognate to Old Norse maurr, Danish myre, Middle Dutch miere (ant) (Dutch mier). All probably from Proto-Indo-European *morwi (ant), whence also cognate to Latin formīca.

NounEdit

mire (plural mires)

  1. (obsolete) An ant.
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From miri +‎ -e.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmire/
  • Hyphenation: mi‧re
  • Rhymes: -ire

AdverbEdit

mire

  1. in surprise, in awe, in an amazed way

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /miʁ/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Italian mira, from Latin mīrō (I wonder at).

NounEdit

mire f (plural mires)

  1. (archaic) aim (action of aiming)
  2. foresight (of rifle)
  3. target (literal, figurative)
  4. (television) test pattern

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

mire

  1. inflection of mirer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

mi (what?) +‎ -re (sublative case suffix)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmirɛ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mi‧re

PronounEdit

mire

  1. sublative singular of mi
    Mire gondolsz?What are you thinking about?

PronounEdit

mire

  1. for what (purpose)?
    Mire jó ez?What is it for?

AdverbEdit

mire (not comparable)

  1. whereupon (after which, in consequence)
    Megszidtam, mire sírva fakadt.I scolded her, whereupon she started to cry.
  2. by the time, when
    Mire hazaértem, a vendégek már elmentek.By the time I got home, the guests had left.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • mire in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish mire (madness, frenzy, infatuation).

NounEdit

mire f (genitive singular mire)

  1. quickness, rapidity
  2. spiritedness, ardor
  3. madness, frenzy, mania
    Synonym: buile
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

AdjectiveEdit

mire

  1. inflection of mear:
    1. genitive feminine singular
    2. comparative degree

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mire mhire not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

mire f

  1. plural of mira

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

ParticipleEdit

mīre

  1. vocative masculine singular of mīrus

ReferencesEdit

  • mire in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mire in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old Norse mýrr, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *miuzijō.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mire (plural mires)

  1. Marshy or swampy land; a mire or peat.
  2. A region of marshy or swampy land.
  3. A muddy or dirt-covered region.
  4. (figuratively) Iniquity, sinfulness; immoral behaviour.
  5. (rare) A quagmire or conundrum.
  6. (rare) A puddle or pond; a watery hollow.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inherited from Old English *mȳre, *mīere, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *miurijǭ.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mire

  1. ant
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: mire (ant) (obsolete)
ReferencesEdit

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

mire

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of mirar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of mirar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of mirar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of mirar

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly a substratum word, or from Greek μύρον (mýron, ointment, uncture, holy oil), relating to the ceremony of the Orthodox wedding. Another theory suggests Latin mīles (soldier), possibly mirroring semantic evolution of the rare voină (husband), from Slavic воинъ (voinŭ, warrior). Other less likely etymologies proposed include Turkish amir (chief), Cuman mir ("prince"), a Vulgar Latin *milex, from Ancient Greek μεῖραξ (meîrax, adolescent; boy), or an old Indo-European term[1].

Possibly related to Albanian mirë (good). Replaced mărit, which only survived in some regional dialects.

NounEdit

mire m (plural miri)

  1. bridegroom

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish mire (madness, frenzy, infatuation).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mire f (genitive singular mire, plural mirean)

  1. merriment, mirth, frolic

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
mire mhire
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mire

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of mirar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of mirar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of mirar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of mirar.