English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmaɪə/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmaɪɚ/, /ˈmaɪɹ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Etymology 1 edit

 
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From Middle English mire, a borrowing from Old Norse mýrr, from Proto-Germanic *miuzijō, whence also Swedish myr, Norwegian myr, Icelandic mýri, Dutch *mier (in placenames, for example Mierlo). Related to Proto-Germanic *meusą, whence Old English mēos, and Proto-Germanic *musą, whence Old English mos (English moss).

Noun edit

mire (countable and uncountable, plural mires)

  1. Deep mud; moist, spongy earth.
    Synonyms: peatland, quag
    Hypernym: wetland
    Hyponyms: bog, fen
    • (Can we date this quote?), (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      When Caliban was lazy and neglected his work, Ariel (who was invisible to all eyes but Prospero’s) would come slyly and pinch him, and sometimes tumble him down in the mire. (Charles Lamb, Tales from Shakespeare, Hatier, coll. « Les Classiques pour tous » n° 223, p. 51)
  2. An undesirable situation, a predicament.
    • 2017 April 2, Dafydd Pritchard, “Swansea City 0-0 Middlesbrough”, in BBC Sport[1], London:
      Swansea seemed to be pulling clear of trouble with five wins in their first eight games following head coach Paul Clement's appointment, but two successive defeats had dragged the Swans back into the mire.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

mire (third-person singular simple present mires, present participle miring, simple past and past participle mired)

  1. (transitive) To cause or permit to become stuck in mud; to plunge or fix in mud.
    Synonyms: bemire, enmire
    to mire a horse or wagon
  2. (intransitive) To sink into mud.
  3. (transitive, figurative) To weigh down.
  4. (intransitive) To soil with mud or foul matter.
    Synonym: bemire
    • 1598–1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “Much Adoe about Nothing”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act IV, scene i]:
      Why had I not with charitable hand
      Took up a beggar’s issue at my gates,
      Who smirch’d thus and mired with infamy,
      I might have said ‘No part of it is mine;
      This shame derives itself from unknown loins’?
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English mire, from Old English *mȳre, *mīere, from Proto-West Germanic *miurijā, from Proto-Germanic *miurijǭ (ant). Cognate to Old Norse maurr, Danish myre, Middle Dutch miere (ant) (Dutch mier). All probably from Proto-Indo-European *morwi- (ant), whence also cognate to Latin formīca.

Noun edit

mire (plural mires)

  1. (rare or obsolete) An ant.
    • 1866, The Gardener's Monthly and Horticultural Advertiser Devoted, page 149:
      "Having been seriously interrupted by small brown ants or mires working in my cutting bench, digging holes down the side of my cuttings, thereby arresting the process of rooting. [] "
    • 1915, Daniel T. Trombley, Batiste of Isle La Motte, page 24:
      Wen I lay down behine dat log I plunk masef right een one dem aunty mire nest an bout 10 million of dem leetle devil begin to heat me.
    • 1939, original c. 1300, Publications - Volume 103; Volume 105, page 267:
      The ant figures in the Bestiary, which tells us that the 'mire' is mighty; toils much in summer and in soft weather; stores wood and seed, corn and grass; in winter she is not harmed: she likes wheat, but shuns barley []
Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Asturian edit

Verb edit

mire

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of mirar

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

From miri +‎ -e.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmire]
  • Rhymes: -ire
  • Hyphenation: mi‧re

Adverb edit

mire

  1. in surprise, in awe, in an amazed way

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Italian mira, from Latin mīrō (to wonder at).

Noun edit

mire f (plural mires)

  1. (archaic) aim (action of aiming) [from 1562]
    Synonym: visée
  2. foresight (of rifle) [from 1611]
    Synonym: guidon
  3. (literal, figurative) target [from early 1600s]
    Synonyms: but, cible
  4. (television) test pattern
  5. (surveying) rod (measuring tool)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old French mire, mirie, a semi-learned borrowing from Latin medicus.

Noun edit

mire m (plural mires, feminine miresse)

  1. (historical) medieval physician
    Hypernym: (more generally) médecin (doctor)

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

mire

  1. inflection of mirer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Verb edit

mire

  1. inflection of mirar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Hungarian edit

Pronominal adverbs from case suffixes (cf. postpositions)
ed suffix who? what? this that he/she
(it)*
case v. pr. c.
nom. ki mi ez az ő* / -∅
az / -∅
acc. -t / -ot /
-at / -et / -öt
kit mit ezt azt őt* / -∅
azt / -∅
c1
c2
dat. -nak / -nek kinek minek ennek annak neki neki- c
ins. -val / -vel kivel mivel ezzel/
evvel
azzal/
avval
vele c
c-f. -ért kiért miért ezért azért érte c
tra. -vá / -vé kivé mivé ezzé azzá c
ter. -ig meddig eddig addig c
e-f. -ként (kiként) (miként) ekként akként c
e-m. -ul / -ül c
ine. -ban / -ben kiben miben ebben abban benne c
sup. -n/-on/-en/-ön kin min ezen azon rajta (rajta-) c
ade. -nál / -nél kinél minél ennél annál nála c
ill. -ba / -be kibe mibe ebbe abba bele bele- c
sub. -ra / -re kire mire erre arra rá- c
all. -hoz/-hez/-höz kihez mihez ehhez ahhoz hozzá hozzá- c
el. -ból / -ből kiből miből ebből abból belőle c
del. -ról / -ről kiről miről erről arról róla c
abl. -tól / -től kitől mitől ettől attól tőle c
*: Ő and őt refer to human beings; the forms below them might be
construed likewise. – Forms in parentheses are uncommon. All »

Etymology edit

mi (what?) +‎ -re (sublative case suffix)

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

mire

  1. sublative singular of mi
    Mire gondolsz?What are you thinking about?

Pronoun edit

mire

  1. for what (purpose)?
    Mire jó ez?What is it for?

Adverb edit

mire (not comparable)

  1. whereupon (after which, in consequence)
    Megszidtam, mire sírva fakadt.I scolded her, whereupon she started to cry.
  2. by the time, when
    Mire hazaértem, a vendégek már elmentek.By the time I got home, the guests had left.

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • mire in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Irish mire (madness, frenzy, infatuation).

Noun edit

mire f (genitive singular mire)

  1. quickness, rapidity
  2. spiritedness, ardor
  3. madness, frenzy, mania
    Synonym: buile
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective edit

mire

  1. inflection of mear:
    1. genitive feminine singular
    2. comparative degree

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mire mhire not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

Italian edit

Noun edit

mire f

  1. plural of mira

Anagrams edit

Ladin edit

Verb edit

mire

  1. inflection of mirer:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person singular/plural present subjunctive

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Participle edit

mīre

  1. vocative masculine singular of mīrus

References edit

  • mire”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mire”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Old Norse mýrr, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *miuzijō.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mire (plural mires)

  1. Marshy or swampy land; a mire or peat.
  2. A region of marshy or swampy land.
  3. A muddy or dirt-covered region.
  4. (figuratively) Iniquity, sinfulness; immoral behaviour.
  5. (rare) A quagmire or conundrum.
  6. (rare) A puddle or pond; a watery hollow.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • English: mire (swamp)
  • Scots: mire
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old English *mȳre, *mīere, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *miurijǭ.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mire

  1. ant
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • English: mire (ant) (obsolete)
References edit

Portuguese edit

Verb edit

mire

  1. inflection of mirar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Prasuni edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Nuristani *murdikā́, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *mŕ̥diH (clay, earth, soil), from *mŕ̥ts, from Proto-Indo-European *meld-. Cognate with Ashkun míč, Kamkata-viri muří, mřëí, Waigali muk, English mold (ground, earth).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mire

  1. clay

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Possibly a substratum word, or from Greek μύρον (mýron, ointment, uncture, holy oil), relating to the ceremony of the Orthodox wedding. Another theory suggests Latin mīles (soldier), possibly mirroring semantic evolution of the rare voină (husband), from Slavic воинъ (voinŭ, warrior). Other less likely etymologies proposed include Turkish amir (chief), Cuman mir ("prince"), a Vulgar Latin *mīrex, from Ancient Greek μεῖραξ (meîrax, adolescent; boy), or an old Indo-European term.[1]

Possibly related to Albanian mirë (good). Replaced mărit, which only survived in some regional dialects.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mire m (plural miri, feminine equivalent mireasă)

  1. bridegroom

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ mire in DEX online—Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish mire (madness, frenzy, infatuation).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mire f (genitive singular mire, plural mirean)

  1. merriment, mirth, frolic

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
mire mhire
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “mire”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “mire”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Serbo-Croatian edit

Verb edit

mire (Cyrillic spelling мире)

  1. third-person plural present of miriti

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmiɾe/ [ˈmi.ɾe]
  • Rhymes: -iɾe
  • Syllabification: mi‧re

Verb edit

mire

  1. inflection of mirar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative