See also: fånge and Fänge

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /faŋə/, [ˈfɑŋə], [ˈfɑŋŋ̩]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Danish fange, borrowed from Middle Low German vangen (to catch), from vān, from Proto-Germanic *fanganą. Doublet of (to get).

VerbEdit

fange (past tense fangede, past participle fanget, c fangen, definite or plural fangne)

  1. to catch, to capture
    Jeg kan fange fisk.
    I can catch fish.
InflectionEdit
ReferencesEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Danish fange, borrowed from Middle Low German vangen (captive), a past participle of vangen, vān (to catch), cf. German Gefangener (captive). Late Old Norse fangi and Swedish fånga are also borrowed from Low German.

NounEdit

fange c (singular definite fangen, plural indefinite fanger)

  1. prisoner, captive
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit
ReferencesEdit

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French fange, from Old French fange (mud, addle, mire), from Gothic *𐍆𐌰𐌲𐌲𐌰 (*fagga, mud, addle, mire), from Proto-Germanic *fangō (wetness, moisture), from Proto-Indo-European *penk- (mud, rot, filth). Cognate with Italian fango (mud, sludge) (from Germanic), German feucht (moist, damp), Dutch vocht (moisture, humidity), Old English fūht (moist, damp).

Alternative etymology derives the Old French word from Frankish *fani, *fanja (moor, swamp, mire), from Proto-Germanic *fanją (clay, mud, marsh), from Proto-Indo-European *pan- (mud, slush, morass), related to Old High German fenni (stagnant water, swamp, bog), Old English fenn (swamp, bog). See fen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fange f (plural fanges)

  1. (literary) filth, mire
  2. (literary, figuratively) filth, baseness, debauchery
  3. (literary, archaic) fen, swamp

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fange

  1. inflection of fangen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German vangene and Old Norse fangi

NounEdit

fange m (definite singular fangen, indefinite plural fanger, definite plural fangene)

  1. convict, inmate, prisoner
Derived termsEdit


Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Low German vangen and Old Norse fanga

VerbEdit

fange (imperative fang, present tense fanger, passive fanges, simple past and past participle fanga or fanget, present participle fangende)

  1. to catch, to capture
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From late Old Norse fanga from Middle Low German vangen.[1] Doublet of .

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

fange (present tense fangar, past tense fanga, past participle fanga, passive infinitive fangast, present participle fangande, imperative fang)

  1. to catch, to capture
  2. (archaic) to receive

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From late Old Norse fangi, from Middle Low German vangene.[1]

NounEdit

fange m (definite singular fangen, indefinite plural fangar, definite plural fangane)

  1. convict, inmate, prisoner
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 “fange” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit


Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German vāhen, from Old High German fāhan, from Proto-West Germanic *fą̄han. Compare German fangen, Dutch vangen.

VerbEdit

fange

  1. to catch, to seize

PlautdietschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon fahan

VerbEdit

fange

  1. to nab, to catch

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian , from Proto-West Germanic *fą̄han.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fange

  1. to catch

InflectionEdit

Strong class 7
infinitive fange
3rd singular past fong
past participle fongen
infinitive fange
long infinitive fangen
gerund fangen n
indicative present tense past tense
1st singular fang fong
2nd singular fangst fongst
3rd singular fangt fong
plural fange fongen
imperative fang
participles fangend fongen

Further readingEdit

  • “fange (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal[1] (in Dutch), 2011