fantastic

See also: fantàstic

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French fantastique, from Late Latin phantasticus, from Ancient Greek φᾰντᾰστῐκός (phantastikós, imaginary, fantastic; fictional), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to shine). Doublet of fantastique.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fænˈtæstɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æstɪk

AdjectiveEdit

fantastic (comparative more fantastic, superlative most fantastic)

  1. Existing in or constructed from fantasy; of or relating to fantasy; fanciful.
    He told fantastic stories of dragons and goblins.
    His fantastic post-college plans had all collapsed within a year of graduation.
    She had a fantastic view of her own importance that none of her colleagues shared.
  2. Not believable; implausible; seemingly only possible in fantasy.
    The events were so fantastic that only the tabloids were willing to print them.
    She entered the lab and stood gaping for a good ten minutes at the fantastic machinery at work all around her.
    • 1986 June 6, Richard Feynman, “Personal observations on the reliability of the Shuttle”, in Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident, Report to the President:
      Since 1 part in 100,000 would imply that one could put a Shuttle up each day for 300 years expecting to lose only one, we could properly ask "What is the cause of management's fantastic faith in the machinery?"
  3. Resembling fantasies in irregularity, caprice, or eccentricity; irregular; grotesque.
    • T. Gray
      There at the foot of yonder nodding beech, / That wreathes its old fantastic roots so high.
  4. Wonderful; marvelous; excellent; extraordinarily good or great (used especially as an intensifier).
    "I had a simply fantastic vacation, and I can't wait to tell you all about it!"

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NounEdit

fantastic (plural fantastics)

  1. (archaic) A fanciful or whimsical person.

AnagramsEdit