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DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Danish floth, from Old Norse flóð, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pléh₃tus, from *pleh₃(w)- (flow). Compare Swedish flod, Icelandic flóð, English flood, Dutch vloed, German Flut.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flod c (singular definite floden, plural indefinite floder)

  1. river
  2. (uncountable) high tide

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Old English flōd, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pléh₃tus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flod (plural flodes)

  1. A waterbody or water in general (opposed to land):
    1. A river; a waterbody that moves in one direction.
    2. A lake or ocean; a large open body of water.
  2. A flood; a massive or momentous flooding.
  3. The rise or peak of the tide; rising tide.
  4. The movement of the sea (e.g. tide or flow)
  5. (figuratively) Something that flows or issues in abundance.
  6. (figuratively) A rise, growing or increasing.

Usage notesEdit

This word often appears in rhyming collocations with good.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse flóð, compare with German Flut.

NounEdit

flod f or m (definite singular floda or floden, indefinite plural floder, definite plural flodene)

  1. a flood, deluge
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Low German vlot and German Fluß (now Fluss).

NounEdit

flod m (definite singular floden, indefinite plural floder, definite plural flodene)

  1. a large river
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse flóð

NounEdit

flod f (definite singular floda, indefinite plural floder, definite plural flodene)

  1. a flood, deluge
  2. flood tide (incoming tide), high tide
  3. a large river

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • (tide) flo (Bokmål)

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

 
The word flōd is found, as flodu, on the early 8th century Franks Casket, one of the oldest monuments of Old English.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pléh₃tus, from *pleh₃(w)- (flow). Cognate with Old Saxon flōd, Old Dutch fluot (Dutch vloed), Old High German fluot (German Flut), Old Norse flóð (Icelandic flóð), Gothic 𐍆𐌻𐍉𐌳𐌿𐍃 (flōdus).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flōd m (nominative plural flōdas)

  1. flowing of the tide
  2. river, stream; water as opposed to land
  3. flood, deluge

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse flóð, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pléh₃tus. Compare Danish flod, Icelandic flóð, English flood, Dutch vloed, German Flut.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fluːd/
  • (file)

NounEdit

flod c

  1. a river
    Synonyms: å, älv, ström
  2. a flood
    Synonym: översvämning
  3. a high tide
    Antonyms: ebb, lågvatten
    Synonym: högvatten

Usage notesEdit

  • Rivers and streams in Scandinavia are named älv (-älven), å (-ån), ström (e.g. Göta älv, Lule älv, Svartån, Motala ström, Norrström), while flod is used to refer to rivers abroad.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of flod 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative flod floden floder floderna
Genitive flods flodens floders flodernas

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flod (nominative plural flods)

  1. frost

DeclensionEdit