forecast

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English forecasten, forcasten, equivalent to fore- +‎ cast. The noun is from Middle English forecast, forcast.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

forecast (third-person singular simple present forecasts, present participle forecasting, simple past and past participle forecast or forecasted)

  1. To estimate how something will be in the future.
    to forecast the weather, or a storm
    to forecast a rise in prices
    • 2020 May 6, Graeme Pickering, “Borders Railway: time for the next step”, in Rail, page 52:
      Within six months, the total number of passengers forecast to use the line in the entire first year (650,000) had already been passed. For the first 12 months, the figure was in excess of 1.2 million. And overall, it has grown year-on-year, reaching over two million in 2018-19.
  2. To foreshadow; to suggest something in advance.
  3. (obsolete) To contrive or plan beforehand.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

forecast (plural forecasts)

  1. An estimation of a future condition.
    1. A prediction of the weather.
      What's the forecast for tomorrow?
  2. (gambling) exacta

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Derived termsEdit

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