futile

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French futile, from Latin fūtilis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

futile ‎(comparative more futile, superlative most futile)

  1. Incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, in The Celebrity:
      No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or [] . And at last I began to realize in my harassed soul that all elusion was futile, and to take such holidays as I could get, when he was off with a girl, in a spirit of thankfulness.
    • 1915, George A. Birmingham, Gossamer, chapterI:
      There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy. [] Stewards, carrying cabin trunks, swarm in the corridors. Passengers wander restlessly about or hurry, with futile energy, from place to place.
    • 2011 December 15, Marc Higginson, “Shamrock Rovers 0-4 Tottenham”, BBC Sport:
      Goals from Steven Pienaar, Andros Townsend, Jermain Defoe and Harry Kane sealed the win, but Rubin Kazan's 1-1 draw against PAOK Salonika rendered Spurs' efforts futile.

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FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

futile m, f ‎(plural futiles)

  1. futile

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ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

futile m, f ‎(masculine and feminine plural futili)

  1. futile

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LatinEdit

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