Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English galwes, galewes, galowe, galwe, from Old English ġealga, from Proto-Germanic *galgô, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰalgʰ-, *ǵʰalg-(long switch, rod, shaft, pole, perch). Compare West Frisian galge, Dutch galg, German Galgen, Danish galge, Icelandic gálgi.

NounEdit

gallows ‎(plural gallows or gallowses)

  1. Wooden framework on which persons are put to death by hanging.
    • 1728, Otway, Thomas, “The Atheist, or, the Second Part of the Solider's Fortune”, in The Works of Mr. Thomas Otway, volume 2, London, page 37:
      No, Sir, 'tis fear of Hanging. Who would not ſteal, or do Murder, every time his Fingers itch'd at it, were it not for fear of the Gallows?
  2. (colloquial, obsolete) A wretch who deserves to be hanged.
  3. (printing, obsolete) The rest for the tympan when raised.
  4. (colloquial, obsolete) Suspenders; braces.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

gallows

  1. third-person singular simple present indicative form of gallow