English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English dorre, dore, from Old English dora (humming insect), from Proto-West Germanic *dorō, from Proto-Germanic *durô (bumblebee, humming insect), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰer-, *dʰrēn- (bee, hornet, drone).

Related to Saterland Frisian Doarne (hornet), Middle Low German dorne (bumblebee), Middle Dutch dorne (bumblebee), Dutch dar (drone), Old English drān (drone). More at drone.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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dor (plural dors)

  1. A large European dung beetle, Geotrupes stercorarius, that makes a droning noise while flying
  2. Any flying insect which makes a loud humming noise, such as the June bug or a bumblebee
Derived terms
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Translations
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See also
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Etymology 2

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Compare dor (a beetle), and hum, humbug.

Noun

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dor (plural dors)

  1. (obsolete) a trick, joke, or deception

Anagrams

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Afrikaans

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Pronunciation

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  • Audio:(file)

Adjective

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dor (attributive dorre, comparative dorder, superlative dorste)

  1. dry, wilted (having a relatively low or no liquid content)

Aromanian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology 1

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From Latin doleō. Compare Romanian durea.

Verb

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dor first-singular present indicative (third-person singular present indicative doari or doare, past participle durutã)

  1. to hurt, ache
Usage notes
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Usually used reflexively (e.g. "mi doari"- it hurts/pains (me)), as with the Romanian cognate, which is only conjugated in the 3rd person.

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Etymology 2

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Probably from Late Latin dolus (pain, grief), a derivative of Latin dolor (pain); alternatively, and less likely, from dolus (trickery, deception), from Ancient Greek δόλος (dólos). Compare Romanian dor.

Noun

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dor

  1. wistfulness, melancholy, nostalgia, longing, desire
  2. love
  3. passion
  4. pain, suffering
See also
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Azerbaijani

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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.).

Noun

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dor (definite accusative doru, plural dorlar)

  1. (nautical) mast
    dorlu qayıqa dingy with a mast
    üç dorlu gəmia ship with three masts
  2. (radio, electric) tower

Declension

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    Declension of dor
singular plural
nominative dor
dorlar
definite accusative doru
dorları
dative dora
dorlara
locative dorda
dorlarda
ablative dordan
dorlardan
definite genitive dorun
dorların
    Possessive forms of dor
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) dorum dorlarım
sənin (your) dorun dorların
onun (his/her/its) doru dorları
bizim (our) dorumuz dorlarımız
sizin (your) dorunuz dorlarınız
onların (their) doru or dorları dorları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) dorumu dorlarımı
sənin (your) dorunu dorlarını
onun (his/her/its) dorunu dorlarını
bizim (our) dorumuzu dorlarımızı
sizin (your) dorunuzu dorlarınızı
onların (their) dorunu or dorlarını dorlarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) doruma dorlarıma
sənin (your) doruna dorlarına
onun (his/her/its) doruna dorlarına
bizim (our) dorumuza dorlarımıza
sizin (your) dorunuza dorlarınıza
onların (their) doruna or dorlarına dorlarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) dorumda dorlarımda
sənin (your) dorunda dorlarında
onun (his/her/its) dorunda dorlarında
bizim (our) dorumuzda dorlarımızda
sizin (your) dorunuzda dorlarınızda
onların (their) dorunda or dorlarında dorlarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) dorumdan dorlarımdan
sənin (your) dorundan dorlarından
onun (his/her/its) dorundan dorlarından
bizim (our) dorumuzdan dorlarımızdan
sizin (your) dorunuzdan dorlarınızdan
onların (their) dorundan or dorlarından dorlarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) dorumun dorlarımın
sənin (your) dorunun dorlarının
onun (his/her/its) dorunun dorlarının
bizim (our) dorumuzun dorlarımızın
sizin (your) dorunuzun dorlarınızın
onların (their) dorunun or dorlarının dorlarının

Further reading

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  • dor” in Obastan.com.

Breton

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Etymology

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From Middle Breton dor, from Proto-Brythonic *dor (compare Welsh dôr), from Proto-Celtic *dwār, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwṓr.

Noun

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dor f (plural dorioù)

  1. door

Mutation

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Note: it is the last remnant of nasal mutation in Breton, and becomes "an nor".

Cimbrian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From earlier dort, from Middle High German dort, from Old High German dorot, doret (there). Cognate with German dort (there, yonder).

Preposition

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dor

  1. (Sette Comuni) through, across, along
    de mèrchar dor de biizenthe boundary markers along the meadow

References

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  • “dor” in Martalar, Umberto Martello, Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Cornish

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Etymology

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Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeǵʰ-.[1]

Noun

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dor m (plural dorow)

  1. ground, earth
  2. Earth

Usage notes

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(Earth): undergoes irregular mutation after definite article when referring to the Earth: an nor

Derived terms

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Mutation

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References

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  1. ^ Morris Jones, John (1913) A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative, Oxford: Clarendon Press, § 98 i (3)

Dutch

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Etymology

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From Middle Dutch dorre, from Old Dutch *thurri, from Proto-West Germanic *þurʀī, from Proto-Germanic *þursuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ters-.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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dor (comparative dorder, superlative dorst)

  1. dry, wilted (having a relatively low or no liquid content)

Inflection

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Declension of dor
uninflected dor
inflected dorre
comparative dorder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial dor dorder het dorst
het dorste
indefinite m./f. sing. dorre dordere dorste
n. sing. dor dorder dorste
plural dorre dordere dorste
definite dorre dordere dorste
partitive dors dorders

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Afrikaans: dor
  • Negerhollands: dor

Galician

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Galician-Portuguese door, from Latin dolor, dolōrem.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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dor f (plural dores)

  1. pain
    Synonym: pena
  2. grief
    Synonyms: pena, mágoa
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References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “door”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “door”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • dor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • dor” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • dor” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Latin

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Verb

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dor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of

Middle Dutch

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Preposition

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dor

  1. Alternative form of dōre

Old English

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *dor.

Cognate with Old Saxon dor, Old High German tor (German Tor (gate)), Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌿𐍂 (daur). The Germanic word also existed with the stem *durz (see Old English duru, German Tür). Indo-European cognates include Greek θυρα (thyra), Latin foris, Lithuanian dùrys, Old Church Slavonic двьрь (dvĭrĭ) (Russian дверь (dverʹ)).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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dōr n

  1. a large door, a gate

Declension

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Descendants

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Old Saxon

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *dor.

Cognate with Old English dor, Old High German tor (German Tor (gate)), Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌿𐍂 (daur). The Germanic word also existed with the stem *durz (see Old Saxon duru, German Tür).

Noun

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dor n

  1. a gate, a large door

Declension

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Portuguese

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Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology

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Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese door f (pain), from Latin dolōrem m, from Old Latin *dolōs, from Proto-Italic *dolōs, from Proto-Indo-European *delh₁- (to hew, split). Compare Galician dor and Spanish dolor.

Pronunciation

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  • Rhymes: (Portugal, São Paulo) -oɾ, (Brazil) -oʁ
  • Hyphenation: dor

Noun

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dor f (plural dores)

  1. pain (physical or emotional)

Derived terms

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Descendants

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Rohingya

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Bengali [Term?].

Noun

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dor (Hanifi spelling 𐴊𐴡𐴌)

  1. price
    Synonyms: dam, kimot

Romanian

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Etymology

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Probably from Late Latin dolus (pain, grief), a derivative of Latin dolor (pain); alternatively, and less likely, from dolus (trickery, deception), from Ancient Greek δόλος (dólos).[1] Compare Spanish duelo (sorrow, mourning), French deuil (bereavement).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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dor n (plural doruri)

  1. wistfulness, melancholy, nostalgia, longing; a strong feeling of missing someone or something

Declension

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Derived terms

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References

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  1. ^ dor in DEX online—Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Salar

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Etymology

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Cognate with Turkish tor.

Archaic in Xunhua because they use vañ, a Chinese borrowing instead.

Pronunciation

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  • (Qingshui, Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): [tʰor]
  • (Ili, Yining, Xinjiang) IPA(key): [tor]

Noun

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dor

  1. (archaic) net
    Synonym: vañ

References

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  • Potanin, G.N. (1893) “тор”, in Тангутско-Тибетская окраина Китая и Центральная Монголия (in Russian), page 430
  • Poppe, Nicholas (1953). Remarks on The Salar Language. Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 16(3/4), 438–477. [1]
  • Yakup, Abdurishid (2002) “dor”, in An Ili Salar Vocabulary: Introduction and a Provisional Salar-English Lexicon[2], Tokyo: University of Tokyo, →ISBN, page 80
  • Ma, Chengjun, Han, Lianye, Ma, Weisheng (December 2010) “dor”, in 米娜瓦尔 艾比布拉 (Minavar Abibra), editor, 撒维汉词典 (Sāwéihàncídiǎn) [Salar-Uyghur-Chinese dictionary], 1st edition, Beijing, →ISBN, page 90
  • 马伟 (Ma Wei), 朝克 (Chao Ke) (2016) “dor (only in Xinjiang)”, in 濒危语言——撒拉语研究 [Endangered Languages ​​- Salar Language Studies], 青海 (Qinghai): 国家社会科学基金项目 (National Social Science Foundation Project), page 278

Slovincian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *darъ.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈdɔr/
  • Rhymes: -ɔr
  • Syllabification: dor

Noun

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dor m inan

  1. gift

References

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Tolai

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Pronoun

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dor

  1. First-person inclusive dual pronoun: you (singular) and I, you (singular) and me

Declension

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Turkmen

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Turkic *tōrug (bay).[1] Cognate with Turkish doru.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /doːr/
  • Hyphenation: dor

Adjective

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dor (comparative dorrak, superlative dor)[2]

  1. (equestrianism) reddish-brown, bay

References

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  1. ^ Clauson, Gerard (1972) “toruğ”, in An Etymological Dictionary of pre-thirteenth-century Turkish, Oxford: Clarendon Press, page 538
  2. ^ dor at Ene dilim

Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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dor

  1. Soft mutation of tor.

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tor dor nhor thor
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.