EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dorre, dore, from Old English dora (humming insect), from Proto-Germanic *durô (bumblebee, humming insect), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰer-, *dʰrēn- (bee, hornet, drone).

Related to Saterland Frisian Doarne (hornet), Middle Low German dorne (bumblebee), Middle Dutch dorne (bumblebee), Dutch dar (drone), Old English drān (drone). More at drone.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dor (plural dors)

  1. A large European dung beetle, Geotrupes stercorarius, that makes a droning noise while flying
  2. Any flying insect which makes a loud humming noise, such as the June bug or a bumblebee
Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Compare dor (a beetle), and hum, humbug.

NounEdit

dor (plural dors)

  1. (obsolete) a trick, joke, or deception

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dor (attributive dorre, comparative dorder, superlative dorste)

  1. dry, wilted (having a relatively low or no liquid content)

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin doleō. Compare Romanian durea.

VerbEdit

dor (third-person singular present indicative doari or doare, past participle durutã)

  1. I hurt, ache.

Usage notesEdit

Usually used reflexively (e.g. "mi doari"- it hurts/pains (me)), as with the Romanian cognate, which is only conjugated in the 3rd person.

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from Late Latin dolus (pain, grief), a derivative of Latin dolor (pain); alternatively, and less likely, from dolus (trickery, deception), from Ancient Greek δόλος (dólos). Compare Romanian dor.

NounEdit

dor

  1. longing, desire, want
  2. love
  3. passion
  4. pain, suffering
See alsoEdit

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Breton dor, from Proto-Brythonic *dor (compare Welsh dôr), from Proto-Celtic *dwār, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwṓr.

NounEdit

dor f (plural dorioù)

  1. door

MutationEdit

Note: it is the last remnant of nasal mutation in Breton, and becomes "an nor".


CimbrianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier dort, from Middle High German dort, from Old High German dorot, doret (there). Cognate with German dort (there, yonder).

PrepositionEdit

dor

  1. (Sette Comuni) through, across, along
    de mèrchar dor de biizenthe boundary markers along the meadow

ReferencesEdit

  • “dor” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeǵʰ-.[1]

NounEdit

dor m (plural dorow)

  1. ground, earth
  2. Earth

Usage notesEdit

(Earth): undergoes irregular mutation after definite article when referring to the Earth: an nor

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ J. Morris Jones, A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative (Oxford 1913), § 98 i (3).

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch dorre, from Old Dutch *thurri, from Proto-West Germanic *þurʀī, from Proto-Germanic *þursuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ters-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɔr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dor
  • Rhymes: -ɔr

AdjectiveEdit

dor (comparative dorder, superlative dorst)

  1. dry, wilted (having a relatively low or no liquid content)

InflectionEdit

Inflection of dor
uninflected dor
inflected dorre
comparative dorder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial dor dorder het dorst
het dorste
indefinite m./f. sing. dorre dordere dorste
n. sing. dor dorder dorste
plural dorre dordere dorste
definite dorre dordere dorste
partitive dors dorders

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: dor

GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese door, from Latin dolor, dolōrem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dor f (plural dores)

  1. pain
    Synonym: pena
  2. grief
    Synonyms: pena, mágoa

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • door” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • door” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • dor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • dor” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • dor” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

dor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of

Middle DutchEdit

PrepositionEdit

dor

  1. Alternative form of dōre

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *durą.

Cognate with Old Saxon dor, Old High German tor (German Tor (gate)), Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌿𐍂 (daur). The Germanic word also existed with the stem *durz (see Old English duru, German Tür). Indo-European cognates include Greek θυρα (thyra), Latin foris, Lithuanian dùrys, Old Church Slavonic двьрь (dvĭrĭ) (Russian дверь (dverʹ)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dōr n

  1. a large door, a gate

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *durą.

Cognate with Old English dor, Old High German tor (German Tor (gate)), Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌿𐍂 (daur). The Germanic word also existed with the stem *durz (see Old Saxon duru, German Tür).

NounEdit

dor n

  1. a gate, a large door

DeclensionEdit



PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese door (pain), from Latin dolor, dolōrem, from Old Latin *dolōs, from Proto-Indo-European *delh₁- (to hew, split).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dor f (plural dores)

  1. pain (physical or emotional)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


RohingyaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Bengali [Term?].

NounEdit

dor (Hanifi spelling 𐴊𐴡𐴌)

  1. price
    Synonyms: dam, kimot

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Late Latin dolus (pain, grief), a derivative of Latin dolor (pain); alternatively, and less likely, from dolus (trickery, deception), from Ancient Greek δόλος (dólos)[1]. Compare Spanish duelo (sorrow, mourning), French deuil (bereavement).

NounEdit

dor n (plural doruri)

  1. longing

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ dor in DEX online - Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

TolaiEdit

PronounEdit

dor

  1. First-person inclusive dual pronoun: you (singular) and I, you (singular) and me

DeclensionEdit



WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dor

  1. Soft mutation of tor.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tor dor nhor thor
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.