DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch gapen, from Old Dutch *gapon, from Proto-Germanic *gapōną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁y- (to gape, be wide open), related to Ancient Greek χάσκω (kháskō), Russian зия́ть (zijátʹ), Sanskrit विजिहीते (vijihīte), and Proto-Germanic *gīnaną, *ganōną (English yawn).[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɣaːpə(n)/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ga‧pen
  • Rhymes: -aːpən

VerbEdit

gapen

  1. (intransitive) to yawn
  2. (intransitive) to gape

InflectionEdit

Inflection of gapen (weak)
infinitive gapen
past singular gaapte
past participle gegaapt
infinitive gapen
gerund gapen n
present tense past tense
1st person singular gaap gaapte
2nd person sing. (jij) gaapt gaapte
2nd person sing. (u) gaapt gaapte
2nd person sing. (gij) gaapt gaapte
3rd person singular gaapt gaapte
plural gapen gaapten
subjunctive sing.1 gape gaapte
subjunctive plur.1 gapen gaapten
imperative sing. gaap
imperative plur.1 gaapt
participles gapend gegaapt
1) Archaic.

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: gaap

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN
  2. ^ gap” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.