u U+0075, u
LATIN SMALL LETTER U
t
[U+0074]
Basic Latin v
[U+0076]
U+FF55, u
FULLWIDTH LATIN SMALL LETTER U

[U+FF54]
Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms
[U+FF56]
U+1D58, ᵘ
MODIFIER LETTER SMALL U

[U+1D57]
Phonetic Extensions
[U+1D59]

Translingual edit

Etymology 1 edit

 

Minuscule variation of U, a modern variation of classical Latin V, from seventh century Old Latin adoption of Old Italic letter 𐌖 (V).

Letter edit

u (upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Symbol edit

u

  1. (metrology) Symbol for atomic mass unit
  2. (IPA, phonetics) a close back rounded vowel.
    (IPA, superscript ⟨ᵘ⟩) [u]-coloring, a [u] on- or off-glide (diphthong), or a weak, fleeting, epenthetic or echo [u].
  3. (international standards) transliterates Indic (or equivalent).
  4. (physics) up quark

Gallery edit

See also edit

Other representations of U:

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
Anglo-Saxon Futhorc letter ᚢ (u, “ur”)

From Middle English lower case letter v (also written u), from Old English lower case u, from 7th century replacement by lower case u of the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc letter (u, ur), derived from Raetic letter u.

Before the 1700s, the pointed form v was written at the beginning of a word, while a rounded form u was used elsewhere, regardless of sound. So whereas valor and excuse appeared as in modern printing, have and upon were printed haue and vpon. Eventually, in the 1700s, to differentiate between the consonant and vowel sounds, the v form was used to represent the consonant, and u the vowel sound. v then preceded u in the alphabet, but the order has since reversed.

Pronunciation edit

Letter name
Phoneme

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U, plural us or u's)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the English alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.
    I prefer the u in Arial to the one in Times New Roman.

See also edit

Noun edit

u (plural ues)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U.
  2. A thing in the shape of the letter U
Alternative forms edit
Translations edit

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

u (second person, singular or plural, nominative or objective, possessive determiner ur, possessive pronoun urs, singular reflexive urself, plural reflexive urselves)

  1. (Internet slang, text messaging, colloquial) Abbreviation of you.
    t8k me w u
Derived terms edit

Adjective edit

u

  1. Abbreviation of underwater.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Abbreviations.

  1. (stenoscript) a word-initial letter ⟨u⟩
  2. (stenoscript) the long vowel /uː/ or /juː/ at the end of a word, or before a final consonant that is not /dʒ, v, z/. (Note: the final consonant is not written; [ʊə˞] (-ure, -oor etc.) counts as /uːr/.)
    Thus the words you, your; also derivative yours
  3. (stenoscript) the prefix un-

Derived terms edit

Acehnese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

u

  1. coconut (fruit of the coco palm)

References edit

Afrikaans edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Dutch u.

Pronoun edit

u

  1. (formal) you (singular, subject and object)

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Dutch uw.

Determiner edit

u

  1. (formal) your (singular)

See also edit

Ajië edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

u

  1. to swim

References edit

Akkadian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Semitic *wa (and). Cognate with Arabicوَ(wa) and Biblical Hebrewוְ־(wə̆-).

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

u

  1. and
    • 1755–1750 BCE, King Hammurabi of Babylon, translated by CDLI, Hammurabi Code[1], The Louvre, Prologue, lines 3-5:
      𒀭𒂗𒆤 𒁁𒂖 𒊭𒈨𒂊 𒅇 𒅕𒍢𒁴
      [Enlil bēl šamê u erṣetim]
      den-lil₂ be-el ša-me-e u₃ er-ṣe-tim
      Enlil, lord of heaven and earth
  2. moreover, likewise, also, too
    𒅇 𒅆𒅅𒁕𒄠 𒋗𒁉𒇴 [u šiqdam šūbilam]u₃ ši-iq-da-am šu-bi-lamalso, send me almonds
    • 1755–1750 BCE, King Hammurabi of Babylon, translated by OMNIKA Foundation, Hammurabi Code[2], The Louvre, Law 129:
      𒋳𒈠𒀸𒊭𒀜 𒀀𒉿𒅆 𒀉𒋾𒍣𒅗𒊑𒅎 𒊭𒉌𒅎 𒄿𒈾𒄿𒌅𒅆 𒀉𒋫𒊍𒁁 𒄿𒅗𒍪𒋗𒉡𒋾𒈠 𒀀𒈾 𒈨𒂊 𒄿𒈾𒀜𒁺𒌑 𒋗𒉡𒋾 𒋳𒈠𒁁𒂖 𒀸𒊭𒁴 𒀸𒊭𒍪𒌑𒁀𒆷𒀜 𒅇 𒊬𒊒𒌝 𒀵𒍪𒌑𒁀𒆷𒀜
      [šumma aššat awīlim itti zikarim šanîm ina itūlim ittaṣbat, ikassûšunūtī-ma ana mê inaddûšunūti; šumma bēl aššatim aššassu uballaṭ, u šarrum warassu uballaṭ.]
      šum-ma aš-ša-at a-wi-lim it-ti zi-ka-ri-im ša-ni-im i-na i-tu-lim it-ta-aṣ-bat i-ka-su₂-šu-nu-ti-ma a-na me-e i-na-ad-du-u₂-šu-nu-ti šum-ma be-el aš-ša-tim aš-ša-su₂ u₂-ba-la-aṭ u₃ šar-ru-um IR₃-su₂ u₂-ba-la-aṭ
      If an awīlum's wife has been caught lying with another man, they will be bound and thrown into the water; if the wife's lord wishes to spare his wife, also the king may spare his servant.
Cuneiform spellings
Phonetic

References edit

  • Huehnergard, John (2011) A Grammar of Akkadian (Harvard Semitic Studies; 45), 3rd edition, Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns
  • šiqdu”, in The Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago (CAD), Chicago: University of Chicago Oriental Institute, 1956–2011

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Albanian *wa, from Proto-Indo-European *swom, from Proto-Indo-European *swé. Compare Latin .

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

u

  1. the reflexive pronoun
    u mblodhënthey gathered (literally, “they gathered themselves”)

Alemannic German edit

Etymology 1 edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

u

  1. (Bern) and
    • 2008, Ulrich Stuber, Der Bettleschloss-Tüfel:
      Si hei glachet u der Grossätti het gfunge: „So, jetz wärs Zyt für no chlei öppis z Znacht - u nächär göh mir de ungere.
      She laughed and the grandpa opined: „So, now is the time for a little bit of dinner - and afterwards we'll go downstairs.

Etymology 2 edit

Adverb edit

u

  1. Alternative spelling of uu

Further reading edit

  • u”, in Wörterbuch Berndeutsch-Deutsch (in German), berndeutsch.ch, 1999–2024

Aragonese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin aut.

Conjunction edit

u

  1. or

Aromanian edit

Etymology edit

Probably from an early (proto-Romanian) root *eaua, from Latin illam, accusative feminine singular of ille. Compare Romanian o.

Pronoun edit

u f (short/unstressed accusative form of ea)

  1. (direct object) her

Related terms edit

  • ãl (masculine equivalent)
  • li (plural)

Asturian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin aut.

Conjunction edit

u

  1. or

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin ubi.

Pronoun edit

u

  1. where (relative pronoun)
    Equí ye u alcontré la fueya.
    Here is where I found the leaf.

Adverb edit

u

  1. where
    ¿Du yes? ¿Au vas? ¿Nu tas?
    Where are you from? Where are you going? Where are you in?

Related terms edit

Azerbaijani edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u lower case (upper case U)

  1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Azerbaijani alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Bambara edit

Pronoun edit

u (tone ù)

  1. they

See also edit

Basque edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-second letter of the Basque alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Noun edit

u (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U.

See also edit

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

u f (plural us)

  1. the Latin letter U (lowercase u)

Etymology 2 edit

Catalan numbers (edit)
10
 ←  0 1 2  →  10  → 
    Cardinal: u, un
    Ordinal: primer
    Ordinal abbreviation: 1r

Noun edit

u m (plural uns)

  1. one
Derived terms edit

Cora edit

Particle edit

u

  1. inside
  2. within view (of the speaker)
  3. entering a deep domain; entering a domain in an extensive manner
    utyásuuna ša'ari cahta'a
    The water is pouring into the (deep) pot.

Antonyms edit

  • a (outside; out of view)

References edit

  • Eugene Casad; Ronald Langacker (1985), “'Inside' and 'outside' in Cora grammar”, in International Journal of American Linguistics

Corsican edit

Etymology edit

From the earlier lu. Compare Portuguese o and Aragonese o.

Article edit

u m (feminine a, masculine plural i, feminine plural e)

  1. the

Usage notes edit

  • Before a vowel, u turns into l'.

Pronoun edit

u m

  1. him, it (direct object)

Usage notes edit

  • Before a vowel, u turns into l'.

See also edit

References edit

  • u, lu” in INFCOR: Banca di dati di a lingua corsa

Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Czech u, from Proto-Slavic *u.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

u + genitive

  1. at
  2. by

Further reading edit

  • u in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • u in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Drung edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *d-bu-s.

Noun edit

u

  1. head

References edit

  • Ross Perlin (2019) A Grammar of Trung[3], Santa Barbara: University of California

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Originally the dative and accusative form of jij/gij, from Middle Dutch u, from Old Dutch iu, from Proto-West Germanic *iwwiz, from Proto-Germanic *iwwiz, West Germanic variant of *izwiz, dative/accusative of *jūz, from Proto-Indo-European *yū́. Doublet of jou.

The use as a nominative form is linked to the polite address uwe edelheid (your nobility, your gentility), which was shortened to U E. in writing and at times accordingly pronounced /yˈ(w)eː/. It is debated, however, whether this was the actual cause of the development or whether it merely reinforced it. Compare English you, which was originally an object form, as well as Afrikaans ons and nonstandard Dutch hun.

Cognate with West Frisian jo, Low German jo, ju, English you, German euch.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

u

  1. (personal, second-person singular, subjective) you (polite).
    Bent u klaar?Are you ready?
    Bent u er nog?Are you still there?
  2. (personal, second-person singular, objective) you (polite).
    Ik zal het aan u geven.I will give it to you.
    Dit zal niet werken voor u.This won’t work for you.
  3. (personal, second-person singular, objective) thee (dialectal).
    Ik doe dat wel voor u.I’ll do it for thee.
  4. (personal, second-person plural, subjective) you (polite).
    Hebt u die oefening gemaakt?Have you prepared that exercise?
  5. (personal, second-person plural, objective) you (polite).
    Ze zullen dat wel voor u doen.They’ll do it for you.
  6. (reflexive, second-person singular) thyself (dialectal)
    Gij hebt u niet gewassen.Thou hast not washed thyself.
  7. (reflexive, second-person plural) yourselves (dialectal)
    Wast u eens.Wash yourselves.

Usage notes edit

  • The capitalization of u (as in U or Uw) is now considered old-fashioned and no longer compulsory. In religious contexts, it is still often capitalized when addressing God.
  • In verbs whose second and third persons singular are distinct, u may be construed with either of them. In formal context, the second person form is generally preferred except for the verb hebben (to have). Thus predominantly u bent, kunt, wilt, zult, whereas u heeft is more common than (or at least equally common as) u hebt.
  • See also the usage notes at gij.

Inflection edit

Alternative forms edit

  • (Brabantian) a

Synonyms edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Dutch alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

  • Previous letter: t
  • Next letter: v

Esperanto edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Esperanto alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Noun edit

u (accusative singular u-on, plural u-oj, accusative plural u-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U.

See also edit

Fala edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese o, from Latin illo (he).

Article edit

u m sg (plural us, feminine a, feminine plural as)

  1. (Lagarteiru, Valverdeñu) Masculine singular definite article; the

Pronoun edit

u

  1. (Lagarteiru, Valverdeñu) Third person singular masculine accusative pronoun; him

See also edit

References edit

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web)[4], 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

Faroese edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (upper case U)

  1. The twenty-third letter of the Faroese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

The Finnish orthography using the Latin script was based on those of Swedish, German and Latin, and was first used in the mid-16th century. No earlier script is known. See the Wikipedia article on Finnish for more information, and u for information on the development of the glyph itself.

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Finnish alphabet, called uu and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

u m (plural u)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U.

Fula edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. A letter of the Fula alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Usage notes edit

See also edit

Galician edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin ū.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

u m (plural us)

  1. the name of the letter U.

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese u, from ubi.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

u

  1. (archaic) where, whereby(Can we verify(+) this sense?)
    Synonym: onde
  2. where (interrogative adverb)
    Synonym: onde
    U-los libros? Ulos?Where are the books? Where are they?

References edit

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

u

  1. Romanization of 𐌿

Guinea-Bissau Creole edit

Etymology edit

From Portuguese tu.

Pronoun edit

u

  1. you (second person singular).

Hungarian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The thirty-fourth letter of the Hungarian alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative u u-k
accusative u-t u-kat
dative u-nak u-knak
instrumental u-val u-kkal
causal-final u-ért u-kért
translative u-vá u-kká
terminative u-ig u-kig
essive-formal u-ként u-kként
essive-modal
inessive u-ban u-kban
superessive u-n u-kon
adessive u-nál u-knál
illative u-ba u-kba
sublative u-ra u-kra
allative u-hoz u-khoz
elative u-ból u-kból
delative u-ról u-król
ablative u-tól u-któl
non-attributive
possessive - singular
u-é u-ké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
u-éi u-kéi
Possessive forms of u
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. u-m u-im
2nd person sing. u-d u-id
3rd person sing. u-ja u-i
1st person plural u-nk u-ink
2nd person plural u-tok u-itok
3rd person plural u-juk u-ik

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • (sound and letter): u in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • ([onomatopoeia] imitation of barking): u in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Ido edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (context pronunciation, letter name) IPA(key): /u/

Letter edit

u (upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Ido alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ū (the name of the letter V).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈu/*
  • Rhymes: -u
  • Hyphenation: ù

Letter edit

u f or m (invariable, lower case, upper case U)

  1. The nineteenth letter of the Italian alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

Noun edit

u f (invariable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U.

See also edit

Further reading edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

u

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

K'iche' edit

Pronoun edit

u

  1. his, her, its

References edit

Kashubian edit

Etymology edit

The Kashubian orthography is based on the Latin alphabet. No earlier script is known. See the Kashubian alphabet article on Wikipedia for more, and u for development of the glyph itself.

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Kashubian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Lashi edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *ʔu (egg, bird). Cognates include Burmese (u., egg) and Chinese (, to incubate).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

u

  1. egg

Verb edit

u

  1. to lay an egg

References edit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[5], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ū f (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter V.

Coordinate terms edit

References edit

  • u in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[6], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • anger is defined as a passionate desire for revenge: iracundiam sic (ita) definiunt, ut ulciscendi libidinem esse dicant or ut u. libido sit or iracundiam sic definiunt, ulc. libidinem
  • u in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), part III: “Summary of the Ancient Evidence”, page 32: "Clearly there is no question or doubt about the names of the vowels A, E, I, O, U. They are simply long A, long E, etc. (ā, ē, ī, ō, ū). Nor is there any uncertainty with respect to the six mutes B, C, D, G, P, T. Their names are bē, cē, dē, gē, pē, tē (each with a long E). Or about H, K, and Q: they are hā, kā, kū—each, again, with a long vowel sound."

Latvian edit

 
Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lv

Etymology edit

Proposed in 1908 as part of the new Latvian spelling by the scientific commission headed by K. Mīlenbahs, which was accepted and began to be taught in schools in 1909. Prior to that, Latvian had been written in German Fraktur, and sporadically in Cyrillic.

Pronunciation 1 edit

  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Letter edit

 
U

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Latvian alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.
See also edit

Pronunciation 2 edit

Noun edit

u m (invariable)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter U/u.
See also edit

Lithuanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (upper case U)

  1. The twenty-seventh letter of the Lithuanian alphabet, called u trumpoji and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Livonian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (upper case U)

  1. The thirty-fifth letter of the Livonian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Lower Sorbian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (upper case U)

  1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Lower Sorbian alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.
  2. The name of the Latin-script letter u.

See also edit

Malay edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Malay alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Maltese edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /u/ (short phoneme)
  • IPA(key): /uː/ (long phoneme)
  • IPA(key): /ɔw/, /aw/ (after ; variation is regional and idiolectal)
  • In inherited words, short u occurs almost exclusively in unstressed syllables. In borrowings, it is a full phoneme and commonly stressed.

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Maltese alphabet, written in the Latin script.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Arabicوَ(wa), from Proto-Semitic *wa. Cognate with Hebrewוְ־(wə-).

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

u

  1. and; used to connect words, phrases, etc.
    il-kelb u l-qattusthe dog and the cat
    tpejjep u tixrobshe smokes and drinks
  2. when, as; used after a personal pronoun and followed by an active participle or imperfect verb
    huma u reqdin
    when they were sleeping
    (literally, “they and sleeping”)
    aħna u nitkellmu
    when we were talking
    (literally, “we and we talk”)
Alternative forms edit
  • w (superseded representation of the consonantal pronunciation)

Marshallese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

u (construct form uin)

  1. (alienable) a fish trap

References edit

Mauritian Creole edit

Pronoun edit

u (informal to)

  1. Alternative spelling of ou

See also edit

Mezquital Otomi edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

ú

  1. salt

Adjective edit

ú

  1. sweet

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Andrews, Enriqueta (1950) Vocabulario otomí de Tasquillo, Hidalgo[7] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 36, 76
  • Hernández Cruz, Luis; Victoria Torquemada, Moisés (2010) Diccionario del hñähñu (otomí) del Valle del Mezquital, estado de Hidalgo (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 45)‎[8] (in Spanish), second edition, Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 360

Middle Dutch edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Dutch iuwa, from Proto-Germanic *izweraz.

Determiner edit

u

  1. your (plural)
  2. your (singular, informal)
Usage notes edit

See the usage notes for gi.

Descendants edit
  • Dutch: uw
  • Limburgish: eur

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronoun edit

u

  1. accusative/dative of gi
Descendants edit
  • Dutch: u

Further reading edit

  • uwe”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “u (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Middle English edit

Noun edit

u

  1. Alternative form of ew

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin u, v.

Letter edit

u

  1. u (letter)
  2. v (letter)

Usage notes edit

  • u and v were represented by a single character in Middle French, although scholars consider them to be separate letters both in terms of usage and in terms of pronunciation.

Middle High German edit

Pronoun edit

ū

  1. (personal pronoun, dative, Middle German) Alternative form of iu.

Middle Low German edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

û

  1. (personal pronoun, dative, accusative) Alternative form of .
  2. (possessive) Alternative form of .

Declension edit

Possessive pronoun:

Norman edit

 
Norman Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nrm

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French ueil, from Vulgar Latin oclus, from Latin oculus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ekʷ- (eye; to see).

Noun edit

u m (plural uûs or uur)

  1. (France, anatomy) eye

Norwegian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (letter name): IPA(key): /ʉː/
  • (phoneme): IPA(key): /ʉː/, /ʉ/, /ʊ/
  • (file)

Letter edit

u

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Norwegian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Nupe edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (phoneme): IPA(key): /u/, (after /n/ or /m/) /ũ/

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Nupe alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Occitan edit

Noun edit

u f (plural us)

  1. u (the letter u, U)

Old Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *u.

Preposition edit

u

  1. Denotes approximate location; by, at; with [+genitive]
Descendants edit
  • Czech: u

Etymology 2 edit

Preposition edit

u

  1. Alternative form of v (often before labial consonants)

References edit

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin ubi.

Adverb edit

u

  1. Alternative form of ou (where)
    • c. 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou[9]:
      Dez ke Richart le sout, un espie enveia
      Saveir u Thiebaut ert, e combien gent il a.
      As soon as Richard knew about it, he sent a spy
      to know where Thibalt was, and how many people he had with him.
Descendants edit
  • Middle French: ou

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin u, v.

Letter edit

u

  1. u (letter)
  2. v (letter)
Usage notes edit
  • u and v were represented by a single character in Old French, although scholars consider them to be separate letters both in terms of usage and in terms of pronunciation.

Old Galician-Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ubi.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

u

  1. where
    • 13th century, Vindel manuscript, Martín Codax, Mia irmana fremosa, treides comigo (facsimile)
      Mia irmana fremoſa treides de grado / ala ygreia de uigo u e o mar leuado / E miraremos las ondas.
      Lovely sister, come willingly / To the church in Vigo, where the sea is up, / And we will gaze at the waves.
    • 1264, E. Portela Silva, editor, La región del obispado de Tuy en los siglos XII a XV, Santiago: Tip. El Eco Franciscano, page 364:
      pelo camino que vay peraa devesa de valadares asy como vay o porto do rrio u pasan os carros
      by the road that goes to the wood of Valadares as it goes by the ford of the river where the carts cross

Descendants edit

  • Galician: u
  • Portuguese: u (obsolete)

References edit

  • u” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.

Old Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *u. First attested in the 14th century.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

u [+genitive]

  1. denotes approximate location; by, at
  2. denotes subject of action; at
  3. denotes movement away; away, out of
  4. denotes topographic region; in; at, on
  5. denotes property; in the homestead of
  6. denotes position in a group; among, between
  7. denotes possession; in the possession of
  8. with być; creates a possessive phrase meaning "to have"
  9. denotes witness or subject of some action; in front of, on behalf of
  10. denotes opinion; in one's eyes, in one's opinion, according to
  11. denotes person from whom someone receives; from
  12. denotes person being asked or requested; from, of
  13. denotes object to which something belongs; 's
  14. denotes perpetrator or performer of an action to create a passive voice; by
  15. denotes time; during, at the time of

Related terms edit

prefix

Descendants edit

  • Masurian: û
  • Polish: u
  • Silesian: u

References edit

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

The Polish orthography is based on the Latin alphabet. No earlier script is known. See the history of Polish orthography article on Wikipedia for more, and u for development of the glyph itself.

Letter edit

u (upper case U, lower case)

  1. The twenty-seventh letter of the Polish alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Noun edit

u n (indeclinable)

  1. u, close back rounded vowel

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old Polish u.

Preposition edit

u [+genitive]

  1. denotes a part belonging to a larger whole; of
    palce u nogitoes (literally, “fingers of the foot”)
  2. denotes near position; by, at
    Synonyms: blisko, koło, niedaleko, opodal, podle, w pobliżu
    u drzwiat the door
    u bramat the gates
  3. denotes position with something else; at, by; with; chez
    u Kasiat Kasia's
    u rodzicówat one's parents
    u lekarzaat the doctor's
    u dentystyat the dentist's
  4. denotes tutor or doer of an action; at, with; from
  5. denotes someone or something for which something else is named
    Near-synonyms: pośród, wpośród, wśród
  6. denotes someone or something about which something may apply; among; in
    u mężczyznin men
    u dzikich zwierzątin wild animals
  7. denotes subject of an action; at

Trivia edit

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), u is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 103 times in scientific texts, 27 times in news, 53 times in essays, 75 times in fiction, and 141 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 399 times, making it the 122nd most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990), “u”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), volume 2, Kraków; Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 619

Further reading edit

  • u in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • u in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • 1. u”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish], 2010-2023
  • 2. u”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish], 2010-2023
  • U”, in Elektroniczny Słownik Języka Polskiego XVII i XVIII Wieku [Electronic Dictionary of the Polish Language of the XVII and XVIII Century], 07.03.2022
  • Samuel Bogumił Linde (1807–1814), “u”, in Słownik języka polskiego
  • Aleksander Zdanowicz (1861), “u”, in Słownik języka polskiego, Wilno 1861
  • J. Karłowicz, A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1919), “u”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), volume 7, Warsaw, page 195
  • u in Narodowy Fotokorpus Języka Polskiego

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Rhymes: -u

Etymology 1 edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Portuguese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Noun edit

u m (plural us)

  1. u (name of the letter U, u)

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese u, from Latin ubi. Cognate with Galician u, French , Italian ove and Romanian iuo.

Adverb edit

u

  1. (obsolete) where
    Synonym: onde

Etymology 3 edit

Article edit

u m

  1. Eye dialect spelling of o.

Pumpokol edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Yeniseian *aw (/ *ʔu) ("thou").

Pronoun edit

u

  1. you (second-person plural subjective)

Synonyms edit

Romani edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. (International Standard) The twenty-eighth letter of the Romani alphabet, written in the Latin script.
  2. (Pan-Vlax) The twenty-ninth letter of the Romani alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-sixth letter of the Romanian alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Romansch edit

Etymology edit

From Latin aut.

Conjunction edit

u

  1. or

Rumu edit

Noun edit

u

  1. water

References edit

Salar edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *ol.

Pronoun edit

u

  1. Third person singular pronoun; he, she, it.

Declension edit

See also edit


References edit

  • Tenishev, Edhem (1976), “vu”, in Stroj salárskovo jazyká [Grammar of Salar], Moscow
  • 林 (Lin), 莲云 (Lianyun) (1985), “u”, in 撒拉语简志 [A Brief History of Salar], Beijing: 民族出版社: 琴書店, →OCLC, page 53
  • Ma, Chengjun; Han, Lianye; Ma, Weisheng (December 2010), “u”, in 米娜瓦尔 艾比布拉 (Minavar Abibra), editor, 撒维汉词典 (Sāwéihàncídiǎn) [Salar-Uyghur-Chinese dictionary], 1st edition, Beijing, →ISBN, page 362
  • Yakup, Abdurishid (2002), “u”, in An Ili Salar Vocabulary: Introduction and a Provisional Salar-English Lexicon, Tokyo: University of Tokyo, →ISBN, page 41

Scottish Gaelic edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The eighteenth letter of the Scottish Gaelic alphabet, written in the Latin script. It is preceded by t. Its traditional name is ur (heather).

See also edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

See Translingual section.

Alternative forms edit

  • (uppercase) U

Letter edit

u (Cyrillic spelling у)

  1. The 27th letter of the Serbo-Croatian Latin alphabet (gajica), preceded by t and followed by v.

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Slavic *vъ(n).

Preposition edit

u (Cyrillic spelling у)

  1. (+ locative case) in, at (without change of position, answering the question gdjȅ/gdȅ)
    biti u školito be in school
    u c(ij)elom društvuin the whole society
  2. (+ accusative case) to, into (with change of position, answering the question kùda)
    ići u školuto go to school
    putovati u Amerikuto travel to America
  3. (+ accusative case) on, in, at, during (in expressions concerning time)
    u podneat noon
    u sr(ij)eduon Wednesday
    u zoruat dawn
    U koliko sati?At what time?
  4. (+ locative case) in, during (in expressions concerning time)
    u jednom danuin one day
    u mladostiduring one's youth

Etymology 3 edit

From Proto-Slavic *u.

Preposition edit

u (Cyrillic spelling у)

  1. (+ genitive case) chez

Sicilian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From the lenition of lu, from the apheresis of Vulgar Latin *illu, from Latin illum, from ille.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

u m sg (f a, plural i)

  1. (masculine singular definite article) the
    Synonym: lu
Usage notes edit
  • As for other Romance languages, such as Neapolitan or Portuguese, Sicilian definite articles have undergone a consonant lenition that has led to the phonetic fall of the initial l. The use of this illiquid variant has not yet made the use of liquid variants disappear, but today it is still the prevalent use in speech and writing.
  • In the case of the production of literary texts, such as singing or poetry, or of formal and institutional texts, resorting to "liquid articles" and "liquid articulated prepositions" confers greater euphony to the text, although it may sound a form of courtly recovery.
  • Illiquid definite articles can be phonetically absorbed by the following noun. I.e: l'arancinu (liquid) and ârancinu (illiquid).
Inflection edit
Sicilian articles
Masculine singular definite article Feminine singular definite article Masculine and feminine plural definite article
Definite articles (liquid) lu la li
Definite articles (illiquid) u a i
Definite articles nu
(also: un,'n)
na

Etymology 2 edit

From the lenition of lu, from the apheresis of Vulgar Latin *illu, from Latin illum, from ille.

Alternative forms edit

  • lu (liquid form)

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

u m sg (plural i, female a)

  1. (accusative) him
    Synonym: lu
    U canusci?Do you know him?
  2. (accusative) it, this or that thing
    Synonym: lu
    Quannu desi.When I gave it to you.
Usage notes edit
  • This pronoun can blend in contracted forms with other particles, especially other personal pronominal particles.
Inflection edit
Sicilian pronominal particles
Masculine singular pronominal particles Feminine singular pronominal particles Masculine and feminine plural pronominal particles
mi
ti
ci ci u ci a
ni
vi
ci ci u ci a

Silesian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈu/
  • Rhymes: -u
  • Syllabification: u

Etymology 1 edit

The Silesian orthography is based on the Latin alphabet. No earlier script is known. See the Silesian language article on Wikipedia for more, and u for development of the glyph itself.

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Silesian alphabet, written in the Latin script.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old Polish u.

Preposition edit

u [+genitive]

  1. denotes approximate location; by, at; with
  2. denotes a part belonging to a larger whole; of
    Synonym: przi

Further reading edit

  • u in silling.org

Skolt Sami edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (upper case U)

  1. The thirty-first letter of the Skolt Sami alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Somali edit

Preposition edit

u

  1. to
  2. for

Usage notes edit

  • In Somali, prepositions fall before the verb and not before the noun they modify:
    u sheeg -- to tell (lit. to call to)
    u keen -- to bring to

Spanish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /u/ [u]
  • Audio (Spain):(file)
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • Rhymes: -u
  • Syllabification: u

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-second letter of the Spanish alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Noun edit

u f (plural úes)

  1. Name of the letter U

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

u

  1. or
Usage notes edit
  • Used instead of o when the following word starts with a vowel sound which is pronounced /o/.
Alternative forms edit
  • ú (obsolete)

Further reading edit

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

u

  1. Romanization of 𒌋

Swahili edit

Verb edit

u

  1. (uncommon, archaic) you are; thou art
    u hali gani?how are you doing?
    Pepo waliwatoka watu wengi, wakapiga kelele wakisema: "Wewe u Mwana wa Mungu!"Demons came out of many people, shouting, "You are the Son of God!"

Usage notes edit

This term is archaic except in the common greeting u hali gani. Along with m and ni it is not conjugated.

See also edit

Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter name
Phoneme

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Swedish alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

Tagalog edit

Etymology edit

From Spanish u. Each pronunciation has a different source:

  • Filipino alphabet pronunciation is influenced by English u.
  • Abakada alphabet pronunciation is influenced by the Baybayin character (u).
  • Abecedario pronunciation is from Spanish u.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: u
  • (letter name, Filipino alphabet): IPA(key): /ju/, [jʊ]
  • (letter name, Abakada alphabet, Abecedario): IPA(key): /ʔu/, [ʔʊ]
  • (phoneme): IPA(key): /ʔu/, [ʔʊ]
  • (phoneme, Spanish-based spellings, before vowels): IPA(key): /w/, [w]
  • Rhymes: -u

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U, Baybayin spelling ᜌᜓ)

  1. The twenty-third letter of the Tagalog alphabet (Filipino alphabet), called yu and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U, Baybayin spelling )

  1. The eighteenth letter of the Tagalog alphabet (Abakada alphabet), called u and written in the Latin script.
  2. (historical) The twenty-fourth letter of the Tagalog alphabet (Abecedario), called u and written in the Latin script.

Noun edit

u (Baybayin spelling )

  1. the name of the Latin-script letter U, in the Abakada alphabet.
  2. (historical) the name of the Latin-script letter U, in the Abecedario.

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • u”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Tausug edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qulu, compare Tagalog ulo.

Noun edit

ū

  1. head

Derived terms edit

Tolai edit

Pronoun edit

u

  1. Second-person singular pronoun: you (singular)

Declension edit


Torres Strait Creole edit

Noun edit

u

  1. (eastern dialect) a mature coconut

Usage notes edit

U is the sixth stage of coconut growth. It is preceded by pes and followed by drai koknat.

Turkish edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Turkish alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Noun edit

u

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U.

See also edit

Turkmen edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (phoneme) IPA(key): /u/, /uː/

Letter edit

u (upper case U)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Turkmen alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Tzotzil edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

u

  1. moon
  2. month

Synonyms edit

References edit

Uyghur edit

Letter edit

u

  1. Latin (ULY) transcription of ئۇ(u)

Pronoun edit

u

  1. Latin (ULY) transcription of ئۇ(u)

Uzbek edit

Other scripts
Cyrillic у (u)
Latin
Perso-Arabic

Pronoun edit

u

  1. he, she, it

Declension edit

Pronoun edit

u (plural ular)

  1. that
    Antonym: bu
    U eshik.That is a door.

Determiner edit

u

  1. that
    Antonym: bu
    u eshikthat door

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

u (𡠄)

  1. (Northern Vietnam) mother; mom
Synonyms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Vietic *ʔuː (hump (of a zebu)).

 
Vietnamese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia vi

Noun edit

(classifier khối, cục) u (, 𢉾)

  1. a nodule; protuberance; swelling
  2. (oncology, pathology) a tumor; neoplasm
Derived terms edit
See also edit

Verb edit

u

  1. to get bumpy; to swell

Etymology 3 edit

 
Vietnamese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia vi

Noun edit

u

  1. (children's games) a game consists of two teams, where the offensive player has to chant ⟨u⟩ during offense

Etymology 4 edit

From Portuguese u.

Noun edit

u

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U.

Volapük edit

Conjunction edit

u

  1. or

Alternative forms edit

  • (in front of vowels) ud

Welsh edit

Alternative forms edit

  • (with grave accent to indicate otherwise unpredictable short vowel): ù
  • (with acute accent to indicate unusually stressed short vowel): ú
  • (with circumflex to indicate otherwise unpredictable or unusually stressed long vowel or disyllabicity): û
  • (with diaeresis to indicate disyllabicity): ü

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Welsh alphabet, called u and written in the Latin script. It is preceded by th and followed by w.

Mutation edit

  • u cannot mutate but, being a vowel, does take h-prothesis, for example with the word uchelwydd (mistletoe):
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
uchelwydd unchanged unchanged huchelwydd
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

See also edit

Derived terms edit

  • Digraph sequences: uw

Noun edit

u f (plural uau)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U.

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
u unchanged unchanged hu
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Yoruba edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-third letter of the Yoruba alphabet, called ú and written in the Latin script.

Noun edit

ú

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter U.

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

u

  1. him, her, it (third-person singular object pronoun following a monosyllabic verb with a high-tone /u/)

Pronoun edit

ú

  1. him, her, it (third-person singular object pronoun following a monosyllabic verb with a low- or mid-tone /u/)

See also edit

Zou edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

u

  1. sibling

References edit

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 41, 60

Zulu edit

Letter edit

u (lower case, upper case U)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Zulu alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit