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See also: gavé and gåve

Contents

EnglishEdit

 gave on Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Old English ġæf, ġeaf.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gave

  1. simple past tense of give
    • c. 1471, An English Chronicle, 1377-1461:
      there the erl of Dunbar becam his manne, and the kyng yaf him the Counte of Richemunde.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, King Henry VI, part 1:
      I gaue thee Life, and rescu'd thee from Death.
    • 1815, Jane Austen, Emma:
      The superior degree of confidence towards Harriet, which this one article marked, gave her severe pain.
    • 2011, Bob Woffinden, The Guardian, 31 Jul 2011:
      With the Oxford canal at the bottom of his garden, regular canoeing excursions gave him enormous pleasure.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gjǫf, from Proto-Germanic *gebō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gave c (definite singular gaven, indefinite plural gaver, definite plural gaverne)

  1. gift, present
  2. gift (a talent or natural ability)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch gave, from Old Dutch gāva, from Proto-Germanic *gēbō, ablaut variant of *gebō.

NounEdit

gave f (plural gaven or gaves, diminutive gavetje n or gaafje n)

  1. A gift, donation, present
  2. A gift, talent
SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

gave

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of geven

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

gave

  1. Inflected form of gaaf

FrenchEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

gave m, f (definite singular gava or gaven, indefinite plural gaver, definite plural gavene)

  1. a present or gift (something given to someone, e.g. for Christmas or a birthday)
  2. a gift (a talent or natural ability)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit