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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Spanish vega

NounEdit

vega (plural vegas)

  1. (Latin America, Philippines) An open tract of ground; a plain, especially one which is moist and fertile, such as those used for growing tobacco.

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps chosen arbitrarily as a word beginning with "v" (for "volatility") that sounds as if it could be a Greek letter (like the related risk parameters "delta", "gamma" etc.)

NounEdit

vega (plural vegas)

  1. (finance) A measurement of the sensitivity of the value of an option to changes in the implied volatility of the price of the underlying asset.

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

  • (measure of derivative price sensitivity): Greeks (includes list of coordinate terms)

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

vega f (plural vegues)

  1. meadow
  2. romp in the open air

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Likely from vega-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vega m (plural vega's)

  1. (informal) A vegetarian, a veggie.

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vega (to weigh), from Proto-Germanic *weganą (to carry, move, weigh), from Proto-Indo-European *wéǵʰe-, *weǵʰ-.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vega (strong verb, third-person singular past indicative , third-person plural past indicative vógu, supine vegið)

  1. (with accusative) to weigh
  2. (with accusative) to consider, to ponder, to weigh
  3. (with accusative) to slay
    Hetjan drekann.
    The hero slew the dragon.

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vega. Akin to English weigh.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vega (present tense veg, past tense vog, past participle vege, present participle vegande, imperative veg)

  1. to weigh (To determine the weight of an object)
  2. to weigh (To have a certain weight)

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

vega

  1. nominative plural of vegr, ‘ways
  2. (poetic) earth
    Hvé jǫrð heitir, / er liggr fyr alda sonum / heimi hverjum í?
    [...] Jǫrð heitir með mǫnnum, / en með Ásum fold, / kalla vega Vanir. — verses 9 and 10 of the Alvíssmál
    How is the earth named, / that which lies before the sons of men, / in each of the worlds?
    [...] "Earth" it is named among men, / but among the Æsir "Field", / the Vanir call it "Ways".

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *weganą (to carry, move, weigh), from Proto-Indo-European *wéǵʰe-, *weǵʰ-. Compare Old Saxon wegan, Old High German wegan, and Old English wegan, Old Frisian wega, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐌲𐌰𐌽 (wigan).

VerbEdit

vega

  1. to weigh
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Danish: veje
  • Faroese: viga
  • Icelandic: vega
  • Norwegian Bokmål: veie
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: vega, vege
  • Swedish: väga

ReferencesEdit

  • vega in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish vayca, from Old Basque *bai-ko (river plain, water meadow); akin to Basque ibaiki (riverbank), from ibai (river).

NounEdit

vega f (plural vegas)

  1. meadow
  2. fertile lowland
  3. grassy plain
  4. valley (the fertile lowlands surrounding a river)
  5. alluvial plain
  6. (Carribean) tobacco plantation

See alsoEdit