See also: Gein and géin

English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from German Geïn, coined by Jöns Jacob Berzelius in 1832, from Ancient Greek γήινος (gḗinos, of earth), from γῆ (, earth).[1]

Noun edit

gein (uncountable)

  1. (chemistry, dated) Humic acid.
    • 1843 January 9, Henry Bidleman Bascom, “Glance at the Natural History and Philosophy of Agriculture []”, in Thomas N. Ralston, editor, Posthumous Works of the Rev. Henry B. Bascom, [], volume 2, published 1856, page 201:
      Hence, a most interesting conclusion—without salts and gein we have no vegetable production. The gein in solution is essential to fruit, and yet, without the salts, the insolubility of gein would leave the soil barren.
    • 1893, John Nisbet, Soil and Situation in Relation to Forest Growth, page 10:
      The humic acid and other similar acids (ulmic, geïn, &c.) have a very strong affinity for ammonia, which itself is essential to the nourishment of forest growth, as plants have only a limited power of assimilating the free nitrogen of the air.
    • 1907, Philip R. Björling, Frederick T. Gissing, Peat: Its Use and Manufacture, page 6:
      Thus with a free supply of air the residue is mainly humin; with less air it is ulmin; and when air is excluded it is gein.

References edit

  1. ^ Browne, Charles A. (1944) A Source Book of Agricultural Chemistry, Waltham: Chronica Botanica Company, page 257

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Yiddish חן (kheyn, grace, charm), from Hebrew חֵן.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gein m (uncountable, diminutive geintje n)

  1. (Netherlands, informal) fun, pleasure, joke

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Finnish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡei̯n/, [ˈɡe̞i̯n]
  • Rhymes: -ein
  • Syllabification(key): gein

Noun edit

gein

  1. instructive plural of gee

Anagrams edit

Icelandic edit

Verb edit

gein

  1. first-person singular past indicative of gína
  2. third-person singular past indicative of gína

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Adjective edit

gein

  1. Alternative form of gayn (direct, fast, good, helpful)

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

gein

  1. Alternative form of gayn (gain, reward, advantage)

Etymology 3 edit

Preposition edit

gein

  1. Alternative form of gain (against)

Old Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *genan, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁-.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gein n (genitive gene, nominative plural gene)

  1. verbal noun of gainithir
  2. birth
  3. (Christianity) the Nativity
  4. someone who was born

Inflection edit

Neuter n-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative geinN geinN geinenL
Vocative geinN geinN geinenL
Accusative geinN geinN geinenL
Genitive geine geinenN geinenN
Dative geinimL geinenaib geinenaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms edit

  • aithgin
  • Fíngin
    Irish: Fínín

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
gein gein
pronounced with /ɣ(ʲ)-/
ngein
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*gan-yo-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 150-151

Further reading edit

Old Norse edit

Verb edit

gein

  1. first/third-person singular past active indicative of gína

Volapük edit

Noun edit

gein (nominative plural geins)

  1. gin

Declension edit