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See also: Gee and gée

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A shortening of Jesus, perhaps as in the oath by Jesus.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

gee

  1. A general exclamation of surprise or frustration.
    Gee, I didn't know that!
    Gee, this is swell fun!
Usage notesEdit

Gee is generally considered somewhat dated or juvenile. It is often used for ironic effect, with the speaker putting on the persona of a freshly scrubbed freckle-faced kid from days gone by (e.g. 1950 sitcom children, such as Beaver on Leave it to Beaver).

SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gee (third-person singular simple present gees, present participle geeing, simple past and past participle geed)

  1. (intransitive) Of a horse, pack animal, etc.: to move forward; go faster; or turn in a direction away from the driver, typically to the right.
    This horse won’t gee when I tell him to.
  2. (intransitive) To cause an animal to move in this way.
    You may need to walk up to the front of the pack and physically gee the lead dog.
  3. (Britain, dialectal, obsolete) To agree; to harmonize.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Forby to this entry?)
    • 1968, Rex Stout, The Father Hunt
      I did use a few of the items, in Elinor's handwriting, to check the writing on the letter that was in the box with the money. It geed.
Coordinate termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

gee (plural gees)

  1. A gee-gee, a horse.

InterjectionEdit

gee

  1. A command to a horse, pack animal, etc., which may variously mean “move forward”, “go faster”, or “turn to the right”.
    Mush, huskies. Now, gee! Gee!

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English, from Old English ge, from Latin ge (the name of the letter G).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gee (plural gees)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter G/g.
    One branch of English society drops its initial aitches, and another branch ignores its terminal gees.
  2. (slang) Abbreviation of grand; a thousand dollars.
    ten gees
  3. (physics) Abbreviation of gravity; the unit of acceleration equal to that exerted by gravity at the earth's surface.
    • 1949 July, St. Clair, Margaret, “Sacred Martian Pig”, in Startling Stories, page 92:
      I've more muscle than you, and I'm used to greater gee, being from earth.
    • 1987, Clancy, Tom, Patriot Games, page 449:
      So if you fire the Phoenix inside that radius, he just can't evade it. The missile can pull more gees than any pilot can.
  4. (US, slang) A guy.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 197:
      Just off the highway there's a small garage and paint-shop run by a gee named Art Huck.
Related termsEdit
  • gay (in shorthand)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gee (plural gees)

  1. (Ireland, slang) vagina, vulva[1]

Etymology 5Edit

Unknown.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gee (third-person singular simple present gees, present participle geeing, simple past and past participle geed)

  1. To suit or fit
    • 1867, Smyth, W.H., The Sailor’s Word-Book: An Alphabetical Digest of Nautical Terms, including some more especially military and scientific, but useful to seamen; as well as archaisms of early voyagers, etc. by the late ADMIRAL W. H. SMYTH, K.S.F., D.C.L., &c.:
      That will just "gee".

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English p. 850, Tom Dalzell and Terry Victor. Routledge, 2006. →ISBN.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch geven.

VerbEdit

gee (present gee, present participle gewende, past participle gegee)

  1. to give
    Ek gee op!
    I give up!

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

gee (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter G/g.

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gee

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter G/g.
  2. (physics) gee (unit of acceleration equal to that exerted by gravity)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of gee (Kotus type 18/maa, no gradation)
nominative gee geet
genitive geen geiden
geitten
partitive geetä geitä
illative geehen geihin
singular plural
nominative gee geet
accusative nom. gee geet
gen. geen
genitive geen geiden
geitten
partitive geetä geitä
inessive geessä geissä
elative geestä geistä
illative geehen geihin
adessive geellä geillä
ablative geeltä geiltä
allative geelle geille
essive geenä geinä
translative geeksi geiksi
instructive gein
abessive geettä geittä
comitative geineen

AnagramsEdit


ManxEdit

VõroEdit

NounEdit

gee (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter G/g.

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.