See also: Gin, GIN, giń, ĝin, gīn, and -gin

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Abbreviation of geneva, alteration of Dutch genever (juniper) from Old French genevre (French genièvre), from Latin iūniperus (juniper). Hence gin rummy (first attested 1941).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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gin (countable and uncountable, plural gins)

  1. A colourless non-aged alcoholic liquor made by distilling fermented grains such as barley, corn, oats or rye with juniper berries; the base for many cocktails.
  2. (uncountable) Gin rummy.
  3. (poker) Drawing the best card or combination of cards.
    Johnny Chan held jack-nine, and hit gin when a queen-ten-eight board was dealt out.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Partly from Middle English gin, ginne (cleverness, scheme, talent, device, machine), from Old French gin, an aphetism of Old French engin (engine); and partly from Middle English grin, grine (snare, trick, stratagem, deceit, temptation, noose, halter, instrument), from Old English grin, gryn, giren, geren (snare, gin, noose).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gin (plural gins)

  1. (obsolete) A trick; a device or instrument.
  2. (obsolete) A scheme; contrivance; artifice; a figurative trap or snare.
  3. A snare or trap for game.
  4. A machine for raising or moving heavy objects, consisting of a tripod formed of poles united at the top, with a windlass, pulleys, ropes, etc.
  5. (mining) A hoisting drum, usually vertical; a whim.
  6. A pile driver.
  7. A windpump.
  8. A cotton gin.
  9. An instrument of torture worked with screws.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

gin (third-person singular simple present gins, present participle ginning, simple past and past participle ginned)

  1. (transitive) To remove the seeds from cotton with a cotton gin.
  2. (transitive) To trap something in a gin.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Italian: ginnare
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English ginnen (to begin), contraction of beginnen, from Old English beginnan, from Proto-Germanic *biginnaną.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gin (third-person singular simple present gins, present participle ginning, simple past gan, past participle gun)

  1. (archaic) To begin.
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iii]:
      Gonzalo: All three of them are deſperate : their great guilt / (Like poyſon giuen to worke a great time after) / Now gins to bite the ſpirits : / []

Etymology 4Edit

Borrowed from Dharug dyin (woman), but having acquired a derogatory tone.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gin (plural gins)

  1. (Australia, now considered offensive) An Aboriginal woman.
    • 1869, Thomas Livingstone Mitchell, Three Expeditions into the Interior of Eastern Australia, Volume 1, page 273,
      His next shot was discharged amongst the mob, and most unfortunately wounded the gin already mentioned ; who, with a child fastened to her back, slid down the bank, and lay, apparently dying, with her legs in the water.
    • 1894, Ivan Dexter, Talmud: A Strange Narrative of Central Australia, published in serial form in Port Adelaide News and Lefevre's Peninsula Advertiser (SA), Chapter XXI, [1]
      From my position I could see the gins pointing back, and as the men turned they looked for a moment and then made a wild rush for the entrance.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, D. Appleton-Century, 1943, Chapter XXI, p. 353, [2]
      How they must have laughed about the strutting of her whose mother was a wanton and aunt a gin!
    • 1988, Tom Cole, Hell West and Crooked, Angus & Robertson, 1995, p.179,
      Dad said Shoesmith and Thompson had made one error that cost them their lives by letting the gins into the camp, and the blacks speared them all.
    • 2008, Bill Marsh, Jack Goldsmith, Goldie: Adventures in a Vanishing Australia, unnumbered page,
      But there was this gin there, see, what they called a kitchen girl.
Related termsEdit
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
ReferencesEdit
  1. ^ R. M. W. Dixon, Australian Aboriginal Words, Oxford University Press, 1990, →ISBN, page 167.

Etymology 5Edit

Cognate to Scots gin (if): perhaps from gi(v)en,[1] or a compound in which the first element is from Old English ġif (English if) and the second is cognate to English an (if) (compare iffen),[1] or perhaps from again.[1]

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

gin

  1. (chiefly Scotland, Northern England, Southern US, Appalachia) If.
    • 1605, Richard Verstegan, Restitution of Decayed Intelligence, in Antiquities: Concerning the Most Noble, and Renowned English Nation:
      [] for pronouncing according as one would ſay at London I would eat more cheeſe if I had it, the Northern man ſaith, Ay ſuld eat mare cheeſe gin ay hadet, and the Weſterne man ſaith Chud eat more cheeſe an chad it.
    • 1804, Robert Couper, Poetry, I. 196:
      Gin the plough rests on the bank, / The loom, the nation, dies.
    • 1809, Thomas Donaldson, Poems, 76:
      An' gin I'm weel and can keep sober / You may look for it in October.
    • 1815, Robert Anderson, Ballads in the Cumberland dialect, page 152:
      He's get han' and siller, / Gin he fancies me.
    • 1860, J. P. K. Shuttleworth, Scarsdale; Or, Life on the Lancashire and Yorkshire Border, Thirty Years Ago, page 158:
      yon felley at Barleigh has wrote farrantly (fairly) to my naunt; gin Robin could bur see ť letter he'd foind no fawt wi' me.
    • 1870, John Christopher Atkinson, Lost; or, What came of a slip from 'honour bright'., page 19:
      Wheeah, Ah thinks thee could, gin ye tried.
    • 1876, Mrs. George Linnaeus Banks, The Manchester Man, page 15:
      "Aw'd never ha slept i' mi bed gin that little un had bin dreawnded, an' me lookin' on loike a stump. Neay; that lass wur Bess, moi wench. We'n no notion wheer th' lad's mother is." Mr. Clough would have pressed the money upon him, but he put it back with a motion of his han.
    • 1880, Banks, Wooers, I. iv:
      [] gin schoo sets off in a tantrum an' flaah's t'mistress wiv her blutherin []
ReferencesEdit
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 gin” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English gin.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈdʒɪn]
  • Hyphenation: gin
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

NounEdit

gin m inan

  1. gin (alcoholic beverage)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • gin in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • gin in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English gin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gin m (plural gins)

  1. gin

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish gainithir (is born), from Proto-Celtic *ganyetor (compare Welsh geni (be born, bear)) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (compare English kin, Latin gignō (beget, bear), Ancient Greek γίγνομαι (gígnomai, become), Sanskrit जनति (janati, beget)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gin f (genitive singular gine, nominative plural ginte)

  1. begetting, birth
  2. fetus
  3. offspring, child, person
  4. generating source

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

gin (present analytic gineann, future analytic ginfidh, verbal noun giniúint, past participle ginte)

    1. give birth to (used only in the autonomous form)
    2. germinate, sprout; spring forth; originate
    1. beget, procreate
    2. generate, produce

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gin ghin ngin
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


JandayEdit

NounEdit

gin

  1. woman, girl

Further readingEdit

  • John Gladstone Steele, Aboriginal Pathways: in Southeast Queensland and the Richmond River

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

gin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ぎん

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English gin.

NounEdit

gin n (plural ginuri)

  1. gin

DeclensionEdit


ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Cognate to dialectal English gin (if), which see for more.

ConjunctionEdit

gin

  1. if (conditional; subjunctive)
    Gin A war ye, A wad gang.If I were you, I would go.
    • 1778, Alexander Ross, Fortunate Shepherdess, page 124:
      Then says the squire,
      Gin that be all your fear,
      She sanna want a man, for want of gear.
      A thousand pounds a year, well burthen free,
      I mak her sure of, gin she'll gang with me.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English [Term?].

PrepositionEdit

gin

  1. Against; nearby; towards.
    gin night(please add an English translation of this usage example)

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish gainithir (is born), from Proto-Celtic *ganyetor (compare Welsh geni (be born, bear)) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (compare English kin, Latin gignō (beget, bear), Ancient Greek γίγνομαι (gígnomai, become), Sanskrit जनति (janati, beget)).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gin (past ghin, future ginidh, verbal noun gintinn, past participle ginte)

  1. beget, produce, father
  2. create, engender
  3. procreate, reproduce
  4. breed
  5. (computing) generate

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
gin ghin
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “gin”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gainithir”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

gin m (plural gines)

  1. gin
    Synonym: ginebra

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English gin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gin n

  1. gin (liquor)

AnagramsEdit


WiradhuriEdit

NounEdit

gin

  1. Alternative spelling of geen