glacial

See also: Glacial

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French glacial, from Latin glaciālis, from glaciēs (ice). The sense "slow" refers to the speed of actual glaciers, typically around 1 meter per day.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡleɪ.sɪəl/, /ˈɡleɪ.ʃ(ɪ)əl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃəl

AdjectiveEdit

glacial (comparative more glacial, superlative most glacial)

  1. Of, or relating to glaciers.
    We examined the glacial deposits.
    Wang Shijin is a glacier expert and director of the Yulong Snow Mountain Glacial and Environmental Observation Research Station.
  2. (figuratively) Very slow.
    • 1917, Everybody's Magazine - Volume 37, Issue 2, Ridgeway Company, page 56:
      He could remember a day that he had spent the whole of (he couldn't have been more than ten) running one of the great, creaking freight elevators at a glacial speed, answering the calls of the bell—one ring, five rings, three rings—with an almost unbearable sense of responsiblity.
    • 1953, United States. Congress. House. Committee on Armed Services, Defense Department Authorization and Oversight, U.S. Government Printing Office, page 1251:
      I understand that you commented that the Japanese are moving at glacial speed. This is not the only area where they are moving at glacial speed. They are moving at glacial speed in terms of trade barriers, and it is one thing that the American people recognize.
    • 1999, Michael Goodchild, Max J. Egenhofer, Robin Fegeas, Cliff Kottman, Interoperating Geographic Information Systems, Springer Science & Business Media, →ISBN, page 133:
      Paradoxically, then, the electronic speed offered by computer-based decision-making is often overwhelmed by the glacial speed of data reformatting and checking.
    • 2010, "Under the volcano", The Economist, 16 Oct 2010:
      Progress on judicial reform has been glacial, meeting enormous resistance.
    • 2014, John P. Kotter, Accelerate: Building Strategic Agility for a Faster-Moving World, Harvard Business Review Press, →ISBN, page 96:
      Lower-level people added front-line information that ordinarily wouldn't have made it up the hierarchy to the executive committee (or would have made it at glacial speed).
    • 2014, Stuart E. Eizenstat, The Future of the Jews: How Global Forces are Impacting the Jewish People, Israel, and Its Relationship with the United States, Rowman & Littlefield, →ISBN, page 105:
      The Gulf States and Saudi Arabia are modernizing but at a glacial speed in a world moving at digital speed.
  3. Cold and icy.
    After the rain and frost, the pavements were glacial.
  4. Having the appearance of ice.
    On cold days, glacial acetic acid will freeze in the bottle.
  5. (figuratively) Cool and unfriendly.
    He gave me a glacial stare.

HyponymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

glacial (plural glacials)

  1. A glacial period (colloquially known as an ice age).
    Synonym: ice age
    Coordinate term: interglacial

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Amy Sterling Casil (2009) The Creation of Canyons, The Rosen Publishing Group, →ISBN, page 8: “Glaciers are masses of highly compressed snow and ice that also flow downward in response to gravity, but much more slowly. This is the origin of the phrase “glacial speed.” If something is described as happening at glacial speed, that means it is occurring at a very slow pace.”

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

glacial (masculine and feminine plural glacials)

  1. glacial

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

glacial (feminine singular glaciale, masculine plural glaciaux, feminine plural glaciales)

  1. glacial (all meanings)

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

glacial m or f (plural glaciais)

  1. frozen, at the temperature of ice
    Synonym: xeado
  2. glacial, pertaining to glaciers
  3. (figuratively) frigid, chilly, not cordial
    Synonym: xélido

Related termsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin glaciālis, from glaciēs (ice).

AdjectiveEdit

glacial m

  1. (Jersey) icy

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

glacial m or f (plural glaciais, comparable)

  1. glacial (cold and icy)
    Synonym: gélido
  2. glacial (relating to glaciers)
  3. relating to ice ages
  4. (figuratively) glacial; cold (emotionally distant)
    Synonyms: frio, gélido

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French glacial, from Latin glacialis.

AdjectiveEdit

glacial m or n (feminine singular glacială, masculine plural glaciali, feminine and neuter plural glaciale)

  1. glacial

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ɡlaˈθjal/, [ɡlaˈθjal]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ɡlaˈsjal/, [ɡlaˈsjal]

AdjectiveEdit

glacial (plural glaciales)

  1. glacial
  2. (figuratively) frigid, chilly, not cordial

Related termsEdit