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See also: Graphite

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Graphit (A. G. Werner 1789), from Ancient Greek γράφω (gráphō, I write).

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹæfaɪt/
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NounEdit

graphite (countable and uncountable, plural graphites)

  1. An allotrope of carbon, consisting of planes of carbon atoms arranged in hexagonal arrays with the planes stacked loosely, that is used as a dry lubricant and in "lead" pencils.
    • 1928, Lawrence R. Bourne, chapter 4, in Well Tackled![1]:
      Technical terms like ferrite, perlite, graphite, and hardenite were bandied to and fro, and when Paget glibly brought out such a rare exotic as ferro-molybdenum, Benson forgot that he was a master ship-builder, […]
  2. Short for graphite-reinforced plastic, a composite plastic made with graphite fibers noted for light weight strength and stiffness.
    Modern tennis racquets are made of graphite, fibreglass and other man-made materials.
  3. A grey colour.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Graphite” in David Barthelmy, Webmineral Mineralogy Database[2], 1997–.
  • graphite”, in Mindat.org[3], Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, accessed 29 August 2016.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

graphite m (plural graphites)

  1. graphite (form of carbon)