See also: Grey

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • gray (often used in the US)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English grey, from Old English grǣġ, from Proto-Germanic *grēwaz (compare Dutch grauw, German grau, Old Norse grár), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰreh₁- (to green, to grow) (compare Latin rāvus (grey), Old Church Slavonic зьрѭ (zĭrjǫ, to see, to glance), Russian зреть (zretʹ, to watch, to look at) (archaic), Lithuanian žeriù (to shine)).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

grey (comparative greyer or more grey, superlative greyest or most grey)

  1. UK and Commonwealth of Nations standard spelling of gray.
  2. (South Africa, slang) Synonym of coloured (pertaining to the mixed race of black and white).[1]

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from grey

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

grey (third-person singular simple present greys, present participle greying, simple past and past participle greyed)

  1. UK and Commonwealth of Nations standard spelling of gray.
    • 1941, Emily Carr, Klee Wyck, Chapter 18, [1]
      Now only a few hand-hewn cedar planks and roof beams remained, moss-grown and sagging—a few totem poles, greyed and split.

NounEdit

grey (plural greys)

  1. UK and Commonwealth of Nations standard spelling of gray.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Colors in English · colors, colours (layout · text)
     white      gray, grey      black
             red; crimson              orange; brown              yellow; cream
             lime, lime green              green              mint
             cyan; teal              azure, sky blue              blue
             violet; indigo              magenta; purple              pink

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 2001, Charlotte Spinks, A New Apartheid? Urban Spatiality, (Fear of) Crime, and Segregation; in Cape Town, South Africa, Destin Development Studies Institute, ISSN 1470-2320

AnagramsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse grey, from Proto-Germanic *grawją, cognate with Faroese groyggj.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

grey n (genitive singular greys, nominative plural grey)

  1. (archaic) bitch (female dog)
  2. wretch, pitiful person
    Greyið mitt!
    You poor little thing!
    Greyið Jón
    Poor John
  3. indefinite accusative singular of grey
  4. indefinite nominative plural of grey
  5. indefinite accusative plural of grey

DeclensionEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English grǣġ, from Proto-West Germanic *grāu, from Proto-Germanic *grēwaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

grey (plural and weak singular greye)

  1. grey, dull, drab (in color)
  2. glinting, glistening

DescendantsEdit

  • English: gray, grey
  • Scots: gray
  • Yola: gry

ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

grey

  1. grey (colour)
  2. Fur of the grey squirrel
  3. grey clothes
  4. grey textiles
  5. An elderly man
  6. A badger

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit

Colors in Middle English · coloures, hewes (layout · text)
     whit      grey, hor      blak
             red; cremesyn, gernet              citrine, aumbre; broun, tawne              yelow, dorry; canevas
             grasgrene              grene             
             plunket; ewage              asure, livid              blewe, blo, pers
             violet; inde              rose, murrey; purpel, purpur              claret

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

grey m (plural greys)

  1. Alternative form of gray (race of extraterrestrials)

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish grey, from Latin grex, gregem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ger- (to assemble, gather together).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɾei/, [ˈɡɾei̯]

NounEdit

grey f (plural greyes)

  1. (obsolete, poetic) flock, herd
    Synonyms: rebaño, rehala
  2. (religion) flock (people served by a pastor, priest, etc., also all believers in a church or religion)
    Synonyms: rebaño, feligresía, congregación, iglesia
    • 1877, Benito Pérez Galdós, Gloria:
      toda la grey díscola y ladina de aquellas verdes montañas
      the whole rebellious and cunning flock from those green mountains

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit