hipster

EnglishEdit

 
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Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

  • (A person interested in the latest trends): hepster (dated) [1]

EtymologyEdit

hip +‎ -ster. First attested for someone carrying something on their hip in the U.S. in the 1920s. Attested as a variant of hepster in the 1940s, for a follower of the latest fashions/trends/styles.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hipster (plural hipsters)

  1. A person who is keenly interested in the latest trends or fashions. [from earlier 20th c.]
    • c. 1954, Jack Kerouac, Untitled poem, in Book of Sketches, 1952-57, Penguin, 2006, p. 239,
      I, poor French Canadian Ti Jean become / a big sophisticated hipster esthete in / the homosexual arts []
  2. A member of Bohemian counterculture.
  3. An aficionado of jazz who considers himself or herself to be hip.
  4. (US, obsolete, Prohibition) A person who wears a hip flask (of alcohol). [2][1]
  5. (US, obsolete, 1930s) A dancer, particularly a female one.[1]
  6. Underwear with an elastic waistband at hip level.

SynonymsEdit

(Prohibition):

Derived termsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

(Prohibition):

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hipster (third-person singular simple present hipsters, present participle hipstering, simple past and past participle hipstered)

  1. To behave like a hipster.
    • 2000, Eugene Davidson, Reflections on a Disruptive Decade: Essays on the Sixties, page 139:
      But it was a white staff member of a reform school who gave Claude Brown the first notion he ever had that there might be something in the world besides dope and sex and hipstering.
    • 2011, Martin Bodek, The Year of Bad Behavior: Bearing Witness to the Uncouthiest of Humanity, →ISBN:
      The hipsters are hipstering, the businessmen are businessing, the parents are parenting, the children are childrening, and the black teenagers are calling each other niggers.
    • 2017, The Rough Guide to the USA, →ISBN:
      If you're up for a night of hipstering, this is a good spot to begin - a grungy joint that nevertheless hosts a solid varying roster of blues, funk, reggae, rock and indie bands.
  2. To dress or decorate in a hip fashion.
    • 2009, Jill Malone, A Field Guide to Deception, →ISBN, page 135:
      Claire's permission, to be going out with this fine, circumspect woman, all hipstered out and cowboy booted, without a chaperone.
    • 2014, Tellulah Darling, My Life From Hell, →ISBN:
      I nudged Theo. “I give him three hours before he's hipstered it back up again.
    • 2019, Michael Pryor, Graveyard Shift in Ghost Town, →ISBN:
      Victorian frock coats and neckwear, with facial hair that would make any hipster contemplate giving up hipstering and taking up...

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Merriam-Webster, "The Original Hipsters"
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 The Gentleman's Gazette, "The Hip Flask", 2018 June 29, Marcello Borges

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English hipster.

NounEdit

hipster m or f (plural hipsters)

  1. hipster

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From English hipster.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hipster m pers (feminine hipsterka)

  1. hipster (person interested in the latest trends)
  2. hipster (aficionado of jazz who considers himself or herself to be hip)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • hipster in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • hipster in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English hipster.

NounEdit

hipster m, f (plural hipsters)

  1. hipster (person interested in the latest trends)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English hipster.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈipsteɾ/, [ˈipst̪eɾ]

NounEdit

hipster m (plural hipsters or hipster)

  1. hipster