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See also: Jazz

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. First attested around 1912 in a discussion of baseball; attested in reference to music around 1915. Numerous references suggest that the term may be connected to jasm and jism.[1]

PronunciationEdit

 
A jazz band, The King & Carter Jazzing Orchestra, in 1921.

NounEdit

jazz (uncountable)

  1. (music) A musical art form rooted in West African cultural and musical expression and in the African American blues tradition, with diverse influences over time, commonly characterized by blue notes, syncopation, swing, call and response, polyrhythms and improvisation.
  2. Energy, excitement, excitability.
  3. The substance or makeup of a thing.
    What jazz were you referring to earlier?
    What is all this jazz lying around?
  4. Unspecified thing(s).
    I'm just going down to the shops and jazz = I am off to purchase items and so on.
  5. (with positive terms) Something of excellent quality, the genuine article.
    That show was the jazz! = That musical concert/television program was most enjoyable.
    This risotto is simply the jazz. = This risotto was cooked in the classic manner.
  6. Nonsense.
    Stop talking jazz.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

jazz (third-person singular simple present jazzes, present participle jazzing, simple past and past participle jazzed)

  1. To destroy.
    You’ve gone and jazzed it now! = It is ruined.
  2. To play (jazz music).
  3. To dance to the tunes of jazz music.
  4. To enliven, brighten up, make more colourful or exciting; excite
  5. To complicate.
    Don’t jazz it too much! = Be careful, it was good to start with!
  6. (intransitive, US slang, dated) To have sex for money, to prostitute oneself.
    • 1931, William Faulkner, Sanctuary, Vintage 1993, page 59:
      Jazzing?’ Temple whispered [...]. ‘Yes, putty-face!’ the woman said. ‘How do you suppose I paid that lawyer?’
  7. (intransitive) To move (around/about) in a lively or frivolous manner; to fool around. [from 20th c.]
    • 1958, Doris Lessing, A Ripple From the Storm, HarperPerennial 1995, p. 119:
      ‘Well, if you're going to jazz about the way you do, I suppose you'll need rouge at your age.’
  8. To distract/pester.
    Stop jazzing me! = Leave me alone.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (2014, ISBN 1317625110 says that most authorities derive it from jasm, a variant of jism. Partridge also says it was first recorded in reference to music in a 1917 Chicago Tribune advertisement for "Bert Kelly's Jaz [sic] Band", having previously been used in baseball.

CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

NounEdit

jazz m (plural jazz)

  1. jazz

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

NounEdit

jazz m

  1. jazz

DeclensionEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jazz m (uncountable)

  1. jazz

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jazz

  1. jazz (style of music)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of jazz (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative jazz jazzit
genitive jazzin jazzien
partitive jazzia jazzeja
illative jazziin jazzeihin
singular plural
nominative jazz jazzit
accusative nom. jazz jazzit
gen. jazzin
genitive jazzin jazzien
partitive jazzia jazzeja
inessive jazzissa jazzeissa
elative jazzista jazzeista
illative jazziin jazzeihin
adessive jazzilla jazzeilla
ablative jazzilta jazzeilta
allative jazzille jazzeille
essive jazzina jazzeina
translative jazziksi jazzeiksi
instructive jazzein
abessive jazzitta jazzeitta
comitative jazzeineen

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz. The compound jazband is attested in a 1918 copy of Le Matin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jazz m (uncountable)

  1. (music) jazz (music style)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

NounEdit

jazz m (invariable)

  1. (music) jazz

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

NounEdit

jazz m (definite singular jazzen)

  1. (uncountable) jazz (form of music)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

NounEdit

jazz m (definite singular jazzen)

  1. (uncountable) jazz (form of music)

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jazz m inan

  1. jazz (music)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jazz m (uncountable)

  1. (music) jazz (music genre)

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:jazz.


SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jazz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jazz m (uncountable)

  1. jazz

Derived termsEdit