See also: hosté, hôte, and høste

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan òste), from Latin hospitem, singular accusative of hospes. Other cognates include French hôte (Old French oste), Spanish huésped, Italian ospite.

NounEdit

hoste m (plural hostes, feminine hostessa)

  1. guest

Usage notesEdit

  • Hoste is used for a guest who stays overnight, who is lodged for free. For a guest who does not stay overnight (eg, a dinner guest), see convidat.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hoste m

  1. vocative singular of host

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hósti (a cough), hósta (to cough), from Proto-Germanic, from Proto-Indo-European *kwas- (to cough).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hoːstə/, [ˈhoːsd̥ə]

NounEdit

hoste c (singular definite hosten, not used in plural form)

  1. cough

VerbEdit

hoste (imperative host, infinitive at hoste, present tense hoster, past tense hostede, perfect tense har hostet)

  1. cough (push air from the lungs)

Etymology 2Edit

From English host.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hovstə/, [ˈhɔwsd̥e]

VerbEdit

hoste (imperative host, infinitive at hoste, present tense hoster, past tense hostede, perfect tense har hostet)

  1. (computing, Internet) to host websites

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

hoste

  1. singular past indicative and subjunctive of hossen

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

hoste m (plural hostes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of hôte

See alsoEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese oste (host, army) (with the h- added back to reflect the Latin etymon), from Latin hostem, accusative singular of hostis (an enemy of the state).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hoste f (plural hostes)

  1. host, horde
  2. army

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • hoste” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • hoste” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • hoste” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

LatinEdit

NounEdit

hoste

  1. ablative singular of hostis

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French hoste, oste.

NounEdit

hoste (plural hostes)

  1. host

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: host

See alsoEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French hoste, oste.

NounEdit

hoste m (plural hostes)

  1. host

See alsoEdit

DescendantsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hósti (onomatopoeia).

NounEdit

hoste m (definite singular hosten, indefinite plural hoster, definite plural hostene)

  1. (onomatopoeia) a cough

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse hósta (sense 1), and English host (sense 2).

VerbEdit

hoste (imperative host, present tense hoster, passive hostes, simple past and past participle hosta or hostet, present participle hostende)

  1. (onomatopoeia) to cough
  2. (computing) to host

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hoste m (oblique plural hostes, nominative singular hostes, nominative plural hoste)

  1. Alternative form of oste

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese oste (host, army) (with the -h- added back to reflect the Latin etymon), from Latin hostem, accusative singular of hostis (an enemy of the state), from Proto-Italic *hostis (stranger, guest), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstis (stranger, guest). Compare Galician hoste, Spanish hueste.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hoste f (plural hostes)

  1. host; army; military troop
  2. herd (a mass of people)
    Synonym: horda

Related termsEdit


SloveneEdit

NounEdit

hóste

  1. inflection of họ̑sta:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural